W dniach 31 stycznia – 2 lutego odbędzie się rejestracja na zajęcia fakultatywne na III roku studiów licencjackich.
Rejestracja odbędzie się przez system USOS. Rozpocznie się 31 stycznia o godz. 20:00 i zakończy 2 lutego o godz. 23:59.

Wszyscy studenci wybierają po jednej grupie zajęć fakultatywnych. Wszystkie zajęcia fakultatywne odbywać się będą zdalnie w piątki w godzinach 17:00-18:30.
Wybierane grupy identyfikowane są nazwiskiem prowadzącego. W grupach obowiązują limity miejsc. W przypadku wyczerpania się limitu miejsc prosimy o zapisanie się do innej grupy.

Prosimy zapoznać się z krótkimi opisami kursów:

dr hab. Alicja Piechucka, Women in American Modernism
The course is intended as an overview of how women and femininity are represented in American literary modernism, the period which saw considerable changes in the roles of women and traditional perception of the sexes, culminating in the emergence of the New Woman. Modernism also saw the emergence of numerous interesting women writers who, sadly, are not always included in basic American literature course syllabi.

The focus of the course will not, however, be on women’s literature only. To make the scope of the syllabus as comprehensive as possible, it seems advisable to take into consideration the points of view of both sexes and, consequently, to include texts by both male and female authors. The reading list encompasses works by key representatives of high modernism, such as T. S. Eliot, as well as authors whom the students have not yet encountered during their course of study such as Mina Loy. The overall aim of the course is to deepen the students’ knowledge of American modernist literature and help them look at it from new perspectives.

dr hab. prof. UŁ Joanna Kruczkowska, Environment and ecocriticism
The course takes up issues related to natural and human environment reflected in literature, art and film (of the British Isles mainly, but not only) as well as basic assumptions of international ecocriticism. The discussion will involve climate change and possible solutions, ecofeminism, the pandemic, housing crisis, tourism, animal/human relations, technology etc. Cultural responses to these issues raise our awareness and stimulate us to change our perception of contemporary society and the planet. The course closes with individual projects inspired by the themes or works discussed in class.

dr Marcin Trojszczak, Language, mind, and culture
The course aims to present some cutting edge research into linguistics that shows how language functions on the neurological, psychological, and cultural levels. More specifically, it discusses 1) the neurobiological basis of human language – where in our brain is it processed and represented?; 2) language-related psychological phenomena, for instance, language production and comprehension, inner speech, mental simulation, tip-of-the-tongue effect, etc.; 3) linguistic and cognitive relativity, i.e., the ways in which language shapes our thinking and vice versa; 4) the role of culture in language and communication including topics such as politeness, language socialization, and metaphors and metonymies. The course combines lectures introducing key concepts with in-class discussions, activities, and presentations.

dr Agnieszka Rasmus, Made in Britain, Remade in H…
Throughout history, artists have borrowed elements from earlier works for use in new cultural contexts and applying new technologies. This class focuses on one particular example of such borrowings: American remakes of British films, stars, filmmakers, and TV series, providing you with an insight into British cinema, Hollywood industry, new media and seriality studies.  We will analyse recent critical discourse on remakes as a form of adaptation as well as look at a few case studies (e.g. The Office, The Wicker Man, Death at a Funeral, etc.) from a range of theoretical perspectives (e.g. star studies, genre, adaptation, etc.).

mgr Marek Molenda, Pedagogical lexicography
The course introduces students to pedagogical lexicography. We will explore theoretical basis of the lexicographic description as well as practical aspects of dictionary building. 

W dniach 28-30 stycznia odbędzie się rejestracja na zajęcia elektywne na II roku studiów licencjackich.
Rejestracja odbędzie się przez system USOS. Rozpocznie się 28 stycznia o godz. 20:00 i zakończy 30 stycznia o godz. 23:59.

Wszyscy studenci wybierają po jednej grupie następujących zajęć (łącznie 4 zajęcia):
Zajęcia elektywne A (wtorki 15:15)
Zajęcia elektywne B (środy 10:00)
Zajęcia elektywne C (środy 11:45)
Zajęcia elektywne D (środy 15:15)

Wybierane grupy identyfikowane są nazwiskiem prowadzącego. W grupach obowiązują limity miejsc. W przypadku wyczerpania się limitu miejsc prosimy o zapisanie się do innej grupy.

Prosimy zapoznać się z krótkimi opisami kursów:

 

Zajęcia elektywne A (wtorki 15:15)

dr hab. Piotr Spyra, The Protestant Reformation in Early Modern England
The course will be devoted to the English Reformation in its cultural, theological and historical contexts. We will discuss examples of religious propaganda (both literary and pictorial), study the intersections of religion with witchcraft and necromancy, and try to understand the Puritan mind. We will also look at the religious demographics of 21st-century Britain and discuss the connections between Protestantism and secularization.

dr Agata Handley, Intertextual Encounters: Interrogating the Presence of Art in Literature, Film and Music Video
Works of art have often been appropriated and repurposed by other artists, working in different art forms.
The course is designed to make you aware of the multiple relationships that exist between visual and literary/textual art forms, and to invite you to explore the turbulent and often subversive nature of those relationships. The main objectives of the course are to learn how to read works intertextually, i.e., to identify how artworks have been appropriated by other artists; to explore the interrelationship between different art forms; and to reflect on the nature of a creative process which is inspired by artworks ancient and modern.
We will focus primarily on the presence of visual arts (e.g., painting, sculpture, and photography) in 20th and 21st century literature, film and music video, engaging in an analysis of representative literary and visual sources, and selections from critical and theoretical texts. You will study work by W.H. Auden, Seamus Heaney, Tony Harrison, Beyonce, and more. You will be encouraged to adopt individual, creative approaches to works of art and literature; and to explore such concepts as intermediality and ekphrasis.

dr Magdalena Szuster, How Plays Work – contemporary American musical theatre and drama
In this course we will look, in very broad terms, at what makes a play and/or a performance work by investigating the various aspects that contribute to the commercial success of a play and its artistic merit. To do so, we will look at some of the most prominent works of American playwrights (mid 20th century to the present) and explore the negotiation between the particularities of the plays in a broader context.
The in-class discussions will be based on assigned readings (articles, plays) and various movie adaptations. The students will also have an opportunity to acquire practical knowledge in stage production (in cooperation with The Music Theatre of Łódź/Teatr Muzyczny w Łodzi). As the course focuses on creative thinking and no final exam is required, active participation and constructive contribution to classroom conversation are crucial.

dr Wiktor Pskit, Word-formation across languages
The aim of the course is to acquaint students with topics in word-formation in English, Polish and (selected) other languages and to equip students with research tools facilitating contrastive word-formation studies. The issues to be discussed include basic concepts in morphology and word-formation, simple and complex words, inflection and derivation, productivity in word-formation, a contrastive approach to word-formation processes in English, Polish and (selected) other languages, and selected contemporary theoretical approaches in morphology.

dr hab. Jerzy Badio, From text to discourse
The course invites its participants to study forms, functions, contexts or topics of a variety of English texts. The students will analyse British and American magazine articles, parts of modern British novels, academic texts, oral presentations, or jokes in order to uncover their structure, meaning, cohesion, coherence, units, background ideologies, goals, or constructions from the point of view of Pragmatics, Cognitive Linguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis. The course participants will be encouraged to take part in group and pair work. Students’ evaluation of the texts will be promoted as well as focus on the use of English during the classes. Some attention will also be spent on how the above topics could be developed into a BA project. 

dr hab. Katarzyna Ostalska, From SF fiction to digital literature
The following course is going to explore the path from SF literature (i.e. Gibson’s Neuromancer) to new types of digital forms of literary works. The aim of the course is to examine how the usage of the electronic media changes the understanding of what “text” is and how it expands possibilities of interpretations.

 

Zajęcia elektywne B (środy 10:00)

prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, A Literary Tutorial in Anglophone Fantastic Literature
The tutorial is, generally speaking, focused on  (mainly anglophone) fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) in its historical development, starting with the Gothic novel and ending with the late 20th c. fantasy literature. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres, including  film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.

prof. dr hab. Piotr Stalmaszczyk, Celtic Languages and Language Contact in the British Isles
The aim of this course is twofold: first, it will discuss and analyse patterns of language contact in general, and in the British Isles in particular; second, the seminar will present selected items in the linguistic history of the British Isles. Language contact will be investigated within the historical and contemporary processes in the British Isles (concentrating especially on the Celtic languages and the Celtic Englishes).
The following issues will be discussed in more detail: understanding language contact; Celtic peoples, their history, culture, literatures and languages; history of Celtic languages; decline of the Celtic languages; informal introduction to Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh; language revival (especially the case of Cornish and Manx) and recent developments; sociolinguistic issues in the history of Celtic languages; problems of defining and delimiting language and dialect; Celtic influence on English vocabulary.
The course provides an opportunity for comparing and contrasting languages and linguistic structures (English/Irish within the Indo-European context). The course is accessible to students intending to specialise in language/linguistics and literature/culture.

dr hab. prof. UŁ Przemysław Krakowian, Current orientations in language teaching
This familiarisation seminar is meant for students whose interest lie in the area of language teaching and who wish to write on a variety of topics within persistent issues in ELT in a modern school setting. The course is conceived as a presentation of selected issues in the field of EFL/ESL in order to provide a comprehensive perspective on the learning/teaching process, with some emphasis on the role of popular technology in language learning, new technologies and the Internet in teaching, mobile learning, distance learning, online learning environments and authoring tools, online assessment and computerised/electronic portfolia in skill development and language assessment.

dr Monika Sarul, Art and Trauma
The course takes a look at some examples of how art is used to present and discuss trauma. Particular attention is paid to how art depicts and/or supports the healing process after trauma. The majority of analysed works focus on war veterans of conflicts from the past (WW I and WW II) as well as contemporary ones (wars in Iraq and Afghanistan). Apart from that, there are a few examples of art depicting civilians dealing with trauma caused by military conflicts, as well as people facing sexual or family trauma. The classes will mainly focus on three broad categories of art: theatre plays, prose and poetry, and films, TV series and animated TV shows.

dr hab. prof. UŁ Krzysztof Kosecki, Fundamentals of Translation
The course focuses on basic concepts and strategies of translation from English into Polish and Polish into English. The following problems will be discussed and analyzed in numerous practical exercises: the role of context in translation; equivalence on word level; equivalence above word level; lexical and grammatical translation strategies; translation of idioms; culture in translation; pragmatics in translation; cognitive and communicative aspects of translation.

mgr Mark Tardi, Like Totally ’80s!: Exploring a Pivotal Decade
Big hair. Big cars. Embarrassing fashion. New Wave music and the 2nd British Invasion. The AIDS epidemic. MTV. This course is an exploratory seminar which will consider the lasting effects and influences of the 1980s in America through landmark work at the time. The work of prominent figures such as Michael Jackson, John Hughes, Madonna, Whitney Houston, Alice Walker, Prince, Bret Easton Ellis, Don DeLillo, Bill Cosby, and others will be examined critically and in a wider context. What do the various works reveal about prevailing concerns at the time? What fears persist? How are racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, and socioeconomic differences portrayed? What impact can be seen today?

Zajęcia elektywne C (środy 11:45)

mgr Mark Tardi, Contemporary American Women Writers & The Innovative Necessity
This is a once-in-a-lifetime discussion class that will feature several in-class visits by internationally-renowned American women writers. Innovation has been the pulse drum of American literary, artistic, and economic endeavors since the mid-19th century, and as such, we will consider the context that produces and the effects of innovation within contemporary American literature. How do contemporary innovative writers expand our view of earlier innovators and canonical figures, such as Dickinson, Hawthorne, Hemingway, Stein, or Whitman? How do innovative and hybrid literary works reflect contemporary concerns? What is the relationship between innovation and racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, and socioeconomic differences? How are technology, sexuality, humor, or emotional register conceptualized? The work of writers Nathalie Handal, Don Mee Choi, Sarah Mangold, E. Tracy Grinnell, Miranda July, Claudia Rankine Paula Vogel, and Sarah Ruhl and others will be discussed. Some sessions will be augmented by creative writing exercises, essays, films, and other materials as necessary. 

dr Monika Kocot, Revolutionary Minds (from William Blake to Jim Morrison)
The course will look at selected British and American literary texts (both poetry and prose) to explore various aspects of revolution and (playful) subversion in culture. The emphasis will be placed on identifying intriguing inspirations and traces of influence between authors and traditions of (sometimes) distant periods in literary history (William Blake and Jim Morrison), as well as between representatives of literary canon and pop culture. We will be reading and discussing texts by the revolutionary Romantics (William Blake, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau) who exerted huge influence on the counterculture of the 1960s (Jim Morrison, John Lennon, George Harrison, Bob Dylan), and still influence those who promote geopoetic revolution (Kenneth White, Gary Snyder).

dr Shauna O’Brien, Documentary Theatre in Britain
Documentary Theatre is a genre of theatre that uses sources found outside a theatrical context (such as interviews, reports, or journals) as the raw material for a dramatic performance. In Britain, theatremakers have used the form to address some of the most divisive social and political issues in recent decades. Institutional racism in the police, the invasion of Iraq, serial killings, and terrorism have all been addressed by theatremakers using this documentary approach. At the same time, the use of documentary techniques can afford a degree of anonymity that can be used by playwrights to present more personal testimony on the stage. This course will explore a variety of these British documentary plays, from verbatim musicals to works that criticise and seek to
deconstruct the documentary form. Students will examine how documentary materials are collected, edited and staged by theatremakers, and interrogate the ethics of these different approaches. Works that will be discussed include Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s London Road, David Hare’s The Permanent
Way, Richard Norton-Taylor’s The Colour of Justice, and Dennis Kelly’s Taking Care of Baby among others. The course will be examined by assignments and a quiz at the end of the semester.

dr hab. Martin Hinton, Fundamental Questions of Language
On this course, you will be asked to consider the most fundamental questions concerning language and its use. The class will be discussion based, and each week we’ll try to answer such questions as: Where does language come from? Can we think without language? How does language refer to reality? How is language linked to thought? Does language have rules and how would we know? Although these questions are philosophical in nature, we’ll be addressing them as linguists and particularly interested in the way that they impact on the practice of linguistics.

dr Przemysław Ostalski, Linguistic puzzles in SYNTAX and MORPHOLOGY (and different ways to solve them)
The objective of the course is to give students an overview of the syntactic and morphological variation across different languages of the world. The course analyzes linguistic puzzles/problems and provides a unique educational activity that combines analytic reasoning and linguistic/cultural awareness. Students learn about the richness, diversity and systematicity of language, while exercising natural logic and reasoning skills. Additionally students discover ways in which speakers of different languages approach reality.

dr hab. prof. UŁ Krzysztof Kosecki, World Englishes
The course provides an overview of world Englishes. It introduces the concepts of standard English, dialect, sociolect, and slang, as well as presents the history of dispersals of the language into various parts of the world. The following varieties are discussed in more detail: English in England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales; English in the USA and Canada; English in Australia and New Zealand; English in South Africa and South-East Asia; English-based pidgins and creoles; Estuary English; English and other European languages; English as a lingua franca.

 

Zajęcia elektywne D (środy 15:15)

dr Joanna Matyjaszczyk, Constructing the Other in English Literature
The course looks into how Otherness is constructed and deconstructed in various works of English literature, especially in medieval and early modern popular literature, but also in Victorian and post-modern fiction. We will discuss popular ballads and romances, short stories, tales, and fragments of plays and novels in order to investigate how different narrative and dramatic works structure their narrative voices, plots and characters around the figure of the Other, engaging in discourses of physical difference and monstrosity, ethnic and religious prejudice (including anti-clericalism, anti-Catholicism, anti-Judaism, Islamophobia), anti-feminism and witchcraft.

dr hab. prof. UŁ Kacper Bartczak, Nature in American Literature
This seminar class will focus on the presence of nature in American literature and thought. We will examine a variety of American literary texts, but also films and visual arts that thematize nature. Beginning in Romanticism, to naturalism, later to modernism and into the later 20th century – nature in its various guises and versions never ceased to fascinate the American mind. Do we belong to nature or are we alien within it? Are we able to create habitable environments in it? We will be looking at texts, but also films and visual arts materials that attend to those issues.
Selected texts:  H. D. Thoreau, Walden, or Life in the Woods (fragments); Herman Melville, Moby Dick (fragments); Ernest Hemingway, “Big, Two-Hearted River”; Wallace Stevens “Sunday Morning”; Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire (fragments); Jean Baudrillard, America (fragments); Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian and The Road (fragments)

dr Marta Goszczyńska, Realism, Modernism and Postmodernism: Developments in 20th- and 21st-Century British Short Fiction
The course offers an overview of the three dominant twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary modes: realism, modernism and postmodernism. The aim will be to place these modes within larger historical, cultural and philosophical contexts, and to characterise their distinctive key features. Realism, modernism and postmodernism will be discussed on the basis of short stories by such writers as Thomas Hardy, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Elizabeth Bowen, Ian McEwan, Angela Carter, David Lodge, Kazuo Ishiguro, Graham Swift, Michele Roberts and A.S. Byatt. The average reading load is around 10-20 pages per week.

dr Przemysław Ostalski, Linguistic puzzles in SEMANTICS and PHONOLOGY (and different ways to solve them)
The objective of the course is to give students an overview of the semantic and phonological variation across different languages of the world. The course analyzes linguistic puzzles/problems and provides a unique educational activity that combines analytic reasoning and linguistic/cultural awareness. Students learn about the richness, diversity and systematicity of language, while exercising natural logic and reasoning skills. Additionally students discover ways in which speakers of different languages approach reality.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Global Shakespeares: Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in different global contexts
Shakespeare’s plays have been translated into over 100 languages and been performed for a variety of audiences across the globe. This course will examine a selection of these global adaptations, from literary reinterpretations of the plays to film adaptations. Students will explore the various routes along which Shakespeare’s plays have travelled across the world and how these routes have been shaped by social, political, and cultural influences. This course will seek to shed light on the complex interplay of local and global factors that have helped Shakespeare become the global phenomenon he is today. In addition to Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello and Macbeth, we will also look at a selection of stage and screen adaptations of these plays. Texts for this course include Sulayman Al-Bassam’s Al-Hamlet Summit, Tom Stoppard’s Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, and Paula Vogel’s Desdemona, a play about a handkerchief. The course will be assessed by assignments and a quiz at the end of the semester.

dr hab. prof. UŁ Kamila Ciepiela, Language in Use
This course is an introduction to how language is used in infinitely intriguing ways in different contexts, and how even a rigorous linguistic analysis of these areas can be fascinating.
While language is a particularly important part of communication, we accept that the context of language use (linguistic and non-linguistic) is crucial for understanding what meaning is being expressed. We adopt a functional approach to language and language analysis, an approach that starts with language in use rather than abstract theories. A function is a use to which something is put. Language is used for many purposes, which perhaps all have in common that meaning is conveyed. Therefore, the focus of the course is on how meaning is constructed and conveyed across contexts, and on what other goals interactants aim to accomplish in communication. In particular, the main topics of the course include: (i) Semiotic codes of communication (ii) Verbal and non-verbal communication, (iii) Spoken and written language, (iv) Talk in interaction, (v) Language variation across interactional contexts and cultures, (vi) Multilingualism, (vii) Language and identities.

Specjalności

Rejestracja na specjalności zakończyła się. Osoby chcące zmienić specjalność proszone są o złożone odpowiedniego poziomu do Dziekana. Nie ma już możliwości zapisania się na dwie specjalności.

 

Seminarium magisterskie

Rejestracja (przez USOS) rozpocznie się 10 grudnia o godz. 20.00 i zakończy 12 grudnia o godz. 23.59.
Należy zapisać się na jedno seminarium przypisane do grupy identyfikowanej nazwiskiem promotora. Seminaria kontynuować będą tematykę proseminariów, dlatego też przypominamy, że wybrane seminarium magisterskiego powinno być kontynuacją proseminarium, na które zapisani byli Państwo w tym semestrze, a prowadzący może zakładać, że uczestnicy seminarium posiadają wiedzę z zakresu tematyki proseminarium. Prosimy nie zapisywać się do grupy seminaryjnej prowadzonej przez osobę, na której proseminarium Państwo nie uczęszczali.
UWAGA: Osoby, które zostały już zakwalifikowane na seminaria przez promotorów w czasie trwania tego semestru (mają oni taką możliwość do 3 grudnia – proszę spytać prowadzących) NIE ZAPISUJĄ się do żadnej grupy w czasie rejestracji.
W grupach obowiązują limity miejsc. W przypadku wyczerpania się limitu miejsc prosimy o zapisanie się do innej grupy.

Od 1 października g. 20.00 do 3 października g. 23.59 odbędzie się rejestracja przez system USOS na zajęcia wybieralne na I roku studiów magisterskich. Do rejestracji potrzebne są dane do logowania w systemie USOS otrzymane podczas rekrutacji. Wszyscy studenci wybierają trzy grupy przedmiotu „Proseminarium” (Są to zajęcia wprowadzające do seminarium magisterskiego, w kolejnym semestrze będą Państwo wybierać jedne z tych zajęć jako kontynuację.) Uwaga: zajęcia w niektórych grupach odbywają się w tych samych godzinach. Prosimy przed zapisaniem się upewnić się, czy zajęcia wybranych grup nie pokrywają się czasowo. W grupach obowiązują limity miejsc. W przypadku wyczerpania się limitu miejsc prosimy o zapisanie się do innej grupy.

Uwaga: Studentów I roku studiów magisterskich z drugiej rekrutacji oraz obcokrajowców którzy nie mają dostępu do USOSu i tym samym nie mogą wziąć udziału w rejestracji elektronicznej prosimy o rejestrację drogą mailową. Proszę wysłać maila na adres joanna.zawislak@uni.lodz.pl z deklaracją wyboru trzech proseminariów (sugerujemy oprócz tego wybór trzech dodatkowych proseminariów które podadzą Państwo jako alternatywę gdyby zabrakło miejsc na proseminaria pierwszego wyboru – prosimy jasno zaznaczyć co jest pierwszym a co drugim wyborem). Prosimy o wysłanie takiego maila w niedzielę 3 X w godzinach 19-21. O przydziale do grup zadecyduje kolejność zgłoszeń. Rejestracja mailowa nie dotyczy osób które mogą się rejestrować poprzez USOS. Rejestracja mailowa zakończyła się; listy przyjętych znaleźć można tutaj.

Opisy proponowanych zajęć znajdują się poniżej.

 

LITERATURA I KULTURA:

prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, Fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction)
The proseminar is, generally speaking, focused on fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) and its links with religious studies and medieval culture. The planned master theses may concern the above mentioned genres, but also other genres of early English literature (written, roughly speaking, before 1900) including drama and film adaptations.

dr hab. Magdalena Cieślak + dr hab. Tomasz Dobrogoszcz, prof. UŁ, Intersections of dystopia and apocalypse in contemporary literature and film
The seminar proposes to look at works of fiction exploring various crisis scenarios, such as end-of-the-world or end-of-civilization motifs, dystopian landscapes, as well as epidemics or outbreak narratives. It aims to explore the ways in which those works, through their dystopian and apocalyptic focus, explore the cultural, social and political fears and anxieties of our times. The analysis of selected novels and films will reveal how those motifs reflect upon issues of ethics, morality, class, gender, ethnicity, ecology, consumerism, etc. Our discussions will aim to show various possible readings of such scenarios, ranging from those embracing the posthuman pessimism of our condition, through those offering hopeful alternatives, to those cherishing the revolutionary and liberating power of apocalypse.

dr hab. Joanna Kruczkowska, prof. UŁ, Environmental issues in modern Irish and British literature and culture
The proseminar will look into the issues of natural and human environment taken up in literature and culture (film, art, museums) of Ireland and Britain as well as international ecocriticism. Themes of the seminar concern climate change, the current pandemic and its relation to human and natural environment, housing crises, ecofeminism, postcolonialism, tourism, technology etc. The works discussed ask questions such as: What is our responsibility for the planet? Can we as common, private people change anything? Do the virtual world, technology or science provide answers or not? What is the future of human relations and how does it relate to the past?  Final assessment includes student projects carried out in different media of their choice (photography, literature, video, mixed media).

prof. dr hab. Wit Pietrzak, Anglophone Literature, Art and Culture between High and Pop
When Bram Stoker wrote Dracula little could he have known that 108 years later bookshelves would be struck by Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight. When the Christian monk(s?) chose to set down the war-hungry Anglo-Saxons’ poem, which has come to give us all nightmares under the resonant title Beowulf, he can’t have foreseen motion pictures, not to mention 3D motion capture Beowulf. On the other hand when Homer sang the noble verses of the Iliad, he must have had a distinct image of Brad Pitt before his mind’s eye. Indeed, the list of classics that popular culture has swallowed, digested and puked back at us verges on the infinite. But is this sardonic tone justified? Is it true that the Homers (and Christian monks?) gave us gems to be savoured while Stephanie Meyers of this world gave us…whatever is the opposite of a gem?
Rather than answer right off the bat, this seminar will suspend verdict. We’ll try to look at what some capture in the neat binary of highbrow and lowbro(w)/popular (from novels to films through poetry to painting, to graphic novels and beyond) in tandem. As the story of the great divide unfolds, we might begin to see how they motivate, borrow from and lend to each other and whether the two categories are still tenable.

dr Marta Goszczyńska, “Post-Postmodernism”? British Fiction in the New Millennium
For the majority of critics commenting on contemporary literature, postmodernism has come to an end and we are now in need of defining the cultural phase that has succeeded it. The course will attempt to engage with ongoing debates about the new period and its relation with its predecessor by looking at six novels published in the new millennium: David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas (2004), Ali Smith’s The Accidental (2005), Zadie Smith’s NW (2012), Jim Crace’s Harvest (2013), Kate Atkinson’s Life after Life (2013), and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Klara and the Sun (2021). In particular, we will investigate some of the claims made and the questions asked about this “post-postmodernism.” Does it indeed reveal a strong ethical commitment and a greater ecological sensitivity? Can it be seen as an attempt to “return to the real”? How does it address distinctly contemporary concerns: multiculturalism, globalisation and cosmopolitanism? What new thematic preoccupations and aesthetic practices does it involve? How does it engage with some recent theoretical approaches, such as posthumanism or affect theory?

dr hab. Alicja Piechucka, prof. UŁ, Film and Feminism:The Condition of Women and the Women’s Movement in American Cinema
The aim of the proseminar is to examine selected examples of American films in terms of how they present the situation of women in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Chronologically speaking, the history of cinema coincides with that of the feminist movement, since both flourished in the 20th century. Nevertheless, American cinema – and cinema in general – is often accused of stereotyping, marginalizing and misrepresenting women and adopting the perspective of heterosexual men, who constitute the overwhelming majority of film directors. The proseminar is intended as an exploration of American films which do not exemplify such tendencies. The focus will be on cinematographic works which feature multidimensional female characters, depict women as fully fledged human beings and tell the viewer something about the condition of women and the changes it has undergone in the last 100 years. Importantly, the films discussed will also be scrutinized with special reference to how they reflect the main postulates of the first three waves of feminism.

 

JĘZYKOZNAWSTWO:

prof. dr hab. Łukasz Bogucki, Media Translation and Localisation
This course focuses on all things audiovisual translation. We will be exploring aspects of subtitling, dubbing, voice-over, surtitling, audio-description, SDH, game localisation and more. Related topics include machine translation, computer-assisted translation, translator training, translation quality assessment and more.

prof. dr hab. Piotr Stalmaszczyk, Languages in Contact and Contrast
This course will focus on general patterns of language contact and it will discuss selected items in contrastive linguistics. Language contact will be exemplified with the process and effects of English borrowings in Polish (or other native languages), with special focus on the most recent borrowings in various domains of life and across different media, and also on possible structural influences of one language upon the other. Discussion will also concentrate on the development of new vocabulary in these language (for example, the new vocabulary connected with the recent pandemia). Additionally, language contact will be investigated within the historical and contemporary processes in the British Isles.
Discussion connected with languages in contrast will focus on contrasting and comparing different patterns in language, starting with vocabulary, word structures and lexical processes, through syntax and semantics, to texts and argumentation patterns. Examples for analysis will come from English and Polish (or other native languages).

dr hab. Janusz Badio, From thought to language and back: how patterns of language reflect human cognition in text and discourse
The course will extend your knowledge of units in language from a cognitive perspective: word, sentence, text and context. We will discuss how selecting language forms results from varied points of view, perspectives, bias and pragmatic goals. Both simple and complex discourses (newspaper articles, press reports, stories, fictional-literary dialogues or jokes) will be used as examples for analysis. Students will be encouraged to extend and adjust the above topics to their own interests and plans of preparing their M.A. theses on linguistics, language and its acquisition, learning and teaching.

dr hab. Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, prof. UŁ, Doing things with words in social contexts
The seminar focuses on language as a type of action in professional and other social contexts. The students will get familiar with a number of sociolinguistic variables and research methods that can be used in linguistics projects.
Accepting that speech is a type of action we are naturally interested in the varied interactions between language and society, therefore the course will invite discussions of sociolinguistic issues, including the relationship between linguistic variation and social factors such as (national, ethnic or gender) identity, class and power, code choices in bi-dialectal or bilingual communities (e.g. Spanglish), attitudes towards language and culture.
We will also explore selected aspects of communication in professional contexts (e.g. medical, legal or journalistic varieties) and try to find implications with regard to how sociolinguistic issues can be used in teaching English as a foreign language. Theoretical issues will be illustrated with sample research tasks.

dr hab. Przemysław Krakowian, prof. UŁ, Modern orientations in ELT
This orientation seminar is meant for students whose interest lie in the area of language teaching and who wish to write on a variety of topics within persistent issues in ELT in a modern school setting. The course is conceived as a presentation of selected issues in the field of EFL/ESL in order to provide a comprehensive perspective on the learning/teaching process, with some emphasis on the role of popular technology in language learning, new technologies and the Internet in teaching, mobile learning, distance learning, online learning environments and authoring tools, online assessment and computerized/electronic portfolia in skill development and language assessment.

dr hab. Anna Cichosz, prof. UŁ, Language as a network of constructions
An idea shared by many people, not necessarily linguists, is that in order to speak a language you need to know its two basic elements: vocabulary and grammar, and that these two components are neatly separated. But what if this is not how language really works? In Construction Grammar, which is the topic of this seminar, the division into grammar and vocabulary is not clear-cut. Every form which has a function or meaning in the language is called a construction. Thus, constructions range from very simple (like the Saxon genitive ‘s in John’s car) to very complex (like wh-questions such as What is it?), and from fully lexicalised (every word is a construction and so are all fixed expressions like once upon a timeno shit or give me a break) to fully abstract or schematic (like an imperative clause), including semi-lexicalised ones (like fucking + adjective, e.g. fucking great or fucking awesome). These constructions are organised into a network in our brain, they interact with one another, form hierarchies, and change with time. During this course we will analyse different types of constructions in English, tracing relations between them. You will learn a lot about how language functions and changes, with special reference to English. You may expect a lot of case studies, looking at real data in electronic corpora of English, a bit of reading and some counting (yes! empirical linguistics is all about numbers, so MS Excel will be your best friend).

dr hab. Piotr Pęzik, prof. UŁ, Linguists and Linguistics in Natural Language Processing
Natural Language Processing is one of the driving forces of the modern-day digital revolution. Web-search, machine-translation, predictive typing, text-to-speech systems and voice-operated virtual assistants are some of the obvious examples of technologies which have already changed the way we communicate, find and process information. The course will offer a gentle introduction to a selection of issues in the vast area of NLP, such as information retrieval, part-of-speech tagging, syntactic parsing, named entity recognition, text classification and intent detection. In particular, we will consider the contribution of formal linguistics to the development and evaluation of language processing solutions as well as the core skills and competencies required of analytical linguists as domain experts in the process of designing and evaluating language technologies.

dr hab. Jacek Waliński, prof. UŁ, Interactions among language, culture, and cognition in translation and business communication
The course focuses on selected aspects of the interaction among language, culture, and cognition for practical applications in translation, business communication, as well as media discourse analysis. The interaction will be discussed from the perspective of cognitive approaches to linguistics coupled with real-world communication samples taken from readily available or self-developed collections of texts. Topics covered include Farzad Sharifian’s Cultural Linguistics, George Lakoff’s Conceptual Metaphor in everyday reasoning, and Ronald Langacker’s Cognitive Grammar. Participants will be instructed on how to develop the skills required to successfully complete their Master’s thesis.

 

ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE A (wtorek 13.30-15)

prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, A Literary Tutorial in Anglophone Fantastic Literature
The tutorial is, generally speaking, focused on (mainly anglophone) fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) in its historical development, starting with the Gothic novel and ending with the late 20th c. fantasy literature. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres, including film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.

dr hab. prof UŁ Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, Speech acts and actions: What language is for
The course introduces a functional perspective on language in which acts of speech are seen as actions in the social world. We will shortly revise models of communication focused on functions of language (e.g. Aristotle, Jakobson, J.L. Austin’s speech act theory) and demonstrate though exercises how such models can be used in analysis of natural language (how people persuade and dissuade, make others believe or doubt things, how they compliment and intimidate). We will consider literal language and different types of suggested meanings (presupposed, implicated, etc. meanings).

dr Tomasz Fisiak, (Pop)Cultural Gothic
The aim of the class is to analyse selected aspects of Gothicism as a (pop)cultural phenomenon, with a particular focus on its impact on the widely understood visual and aural sphere (cinema, music/video). Students will be acquainted with the concepts of intertextuality, interpictoriality and transmediality, among others, to discuss a range of Gothic-inspired films and music videos. Assessment will be based upon two major tasks, i.e. a movie review and a presentation on a music video of one’s choice, as well as active participation in the discussions throughout the semester.

dr Małgorzata Hołda, The Phenomenon of Being-in-the-world in the Literary Works of British Modernism
The aim of this course is to reflect on how the most famous writers of British modernism explore the phenomenon of our being-in-the-world. The problematic under discussion will embrace such categories as beauty and truth, time, female/male dichotomy, authenticity, solitude, contemplative and calculative thinking. The reflection on the above-mentioned topics will be done from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective. Paying special attention to the intersections of literature, philosophy, and visual arts: painting and photography, the course program endeavors to sensitize students to liminal areas, points of indeterminacy, and that which is viewed as marginal.
The schedule will encompass the following, detailed topics: the relationship between beauty (kalon) and truth (aletheia), the coexistence and co-influence of the visual and the verbal arts, female artists and the disavowal of patriarchy (Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, and the Bloomsbury group), the interconnections of literature and psychoanalysis (Virginia Woolf), creative competition and authenticity (Woolf and Katherine Mansfield), time, contemplative thinking, and the notion of epiphany in literature (James Joyce) and philosophy (St. Paul, Luther, Duns Scotus, Heidegger), existential void, loneliness, and confusion (the poetic narration of T. S. Eliot), and others. Since the course prompts the development of effective communication on a vast and diverse range of literary topics it will focus on tutor-to-student and student-to-student interaction with the use of British Library online readings and other resources as a creative stimulus. To receive a positive grade, students are obliged to actively participate in classes and to give a talk and/or write an essay on a topic selected from the list of proposals.

prof. dr hab. Piotr Stalmaszczyk, Language Contact in the British Isles
The aim of this course is twofold: first, it will discuss and analyse patterns of language contact in general, and in the British Isles in particular; second, the seminar will present selected items in the linguistic history of the British Isles. Language contact will be investigated within the historical and contemporary processes in the British Isles (concentrating especially on the Celtic languages and the Celtic Englishes).
The following issues will be discussed in more detail: understanding language contact; Celtic peoples, their history, culture, literatures and languages; history of Celtic languages; decline of the Celtic languages; informal introduction to Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh; language revival (especially the case of Cornish and Manx) and recent developments; sociolinguistic issues in the history of Celtic languages; problems of defining and delimiting language and dialect; Celtic influence on English vocabulary.
The course provides an opportunity for comparing and contrasting languages and linguistic structures (English/Irish within the Indo-European context). The course is accessible to students intending to specialise in language/linguistics and literature/culture.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Global Shakespeares: Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in different global contexts.
Shakespeare’s plays have been translated into over 100 languages and been performed for a variety of audiences across the globe. This course will examine a selection of these global adaptations, from literary reinterpretations of the plays to film adaptations. Students will explore the various routes along which Shakespeare’s plays have travelled across the world and how these routes have been shaped by social, political, and cultural influences. This course will seek to shed light on the complex interplay of local and global factors that have helped Shakespeare become the global phenomenon he is today. In addition to Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello and Macbeth, we will also look at a selection of stage and screen adaptations of these plays. Texts for this course include Sulayman Al-Bassam’s Al-Hamlet Summit, Tom Stoppard’s Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, and Paula Vogel’s Desdemona, a play about a handkerchief. Students will be required to submit an essay at the end of the semester.


ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE B (czwartek 10-11.30)

dr hab. Małgorzata Myk, Highlights of 20th & 21st century North American experimental women’s writing.
The focus of this course is present-day avant-garde writing by North American female authors. We will be analyzing a selection of representative texts that challenge literary norms and genre conventions in ways that interrogate different aspects of culture and politics. We will also re-examine the concept of form as always inextricably related to writing’s content. Apart from reading literary texts, we will also look at relevant excerpts from influential critical and theoretical pieces that help to situate writers in contexts from which their works have been evolving. Our reflection on the texts will be also enhanced by visual resources that help to grasp these works’ material aspect.

dr Anna Wieczorek, Studying meaning and persuasion
The purpose of the course is to familiarise students with semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies of meaning and persuasion. In class, students will be involved in hands-on tasks in which they will rely on Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), an approach to studying language as a social and political tool. This course aims to acquaint students with current trends in semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies in language and the main trends in linguistic analysis of discourse.

The course will cover the following topics to investigate various persuasion strategies in discourse: semantics and semantic relations; pragmatics (speech acts, presupposition, implicature); cognitive linguistics (conceptual metaphor, conceptual mapping); Critical Discourse Analysis.

prof. dr hab. Wit Pietrzak, Monsters within, monsters without
Who doesn’t enjoy getting a glimpse into the workings of a terrifically twisted mind? The course will explore various portrayals of monstrosity, from a raging blood-thirsty vampire (NOT Twilight, because again @#$% Twilight), through a raging blood-thirsty sociopathic murderer, all the way to, you guessed it, a raging blood-thirsty physician. With scant attention to genres (there will be novels, both graphic and the old school, there will be poems, there will be films, there will be blood) or periods (though post-WWII is to be expected most of the time), we will investigate the trials of tribulations of all manner of lunatics on the rampage and sympathise with their helpless victims. And yet, despite the admittedly dreary climes that our sojourns will take us to, one can’t rule out a laugh or two. 

dr hab. prof UŁ, Piotr Pęzik, Introduction to Corpus-based Authorship Attribution
This course is a gentle introduction to idiolect studies and corpus-drive authorship attribution. Idiolect can be defined as the language variety of an individual. Authorship attribution (AA) is „the process in which linguists set out to identify the author(s) of disputed, anonymous or questioned texts” (Coulthard et al. 2016). Authorship attribution and idiolect studies are an important aspect of forensic linguistics. As part of the course we will consider a number of qualitative, computational-quantitative AA methods and explore idiolect corpora in search of co-selection sets which can uniquely identify authors in online and casual communication.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Documentary Theatre in Britain
Documentary Theatre is a genre of theatre that uses sources found outside a theatrical context (such as interviews, reports, or journals) as the raw material for a dramatic performance. In Britain, theatremakers have used the form to address some of the most divisive social and political issues in recent decades. Institutional racism in the police, the invasion of Iraq, serial killings, and
terrorism have all been addressed by theatremakers using this documentary approach. At the same time, the use of documentary techniques can afford a degree of anonymity that can be used by playwrights to present more personal testimony on the stage. This course will explore a variety of these British documentary plays, from verbatim musicals to works that criticise and seek to deconstruct the documentary form. Students will examine how documentary materials are collected, edited and staged by theatremakers, and interrogate the ethics of these different approaches. Works that will be discussed include Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s London Road, David Hare’s The Permanent Way, Richard Taylor-Norton’s The Colour of Justice, and Dennis Kelly’s Taking
Care of Baby among others. The course will be examined by an essay at the end of the semester

 

dr hab. Mikołaj Deckert, prof. UŁ, Audiovisual Translation

The BA seminar covers the basic theoretical and practical notions of Audiovisual Translation, or Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility. Students will get to know different research methods and tools that can be productively used in their BA projects. An important objective is to make participants aware of the idiosyncrasies of particular AVT modes, and enable participants to identify factors that influence the translator’s decisions, for instance in the context of translation quality assessment.

The seminar will also focus on the very process of planning, structuring and writing the BA thesis – discussing issues like data types, data selection and collection, hypothesis formulation, referencing, register, and text editing.

 

Dr hab. Tomasz Dobrogoszcz, prof. UŁ, Constructed worlds/simulated realities

According to the French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, the author of the theory of the simulacra, we all constantly live in a virtual reality. Our experience of the world is necessarily mediated and indirect, it is an illusion which we accept as truth, for lack of better options. What is more, we often lose the ability to distinguish between the real and the representation, or we even consider a copy as “more real” than the reality. The issue of simulated reality features in philosophical disputes on the nature of existence, it resonates in aesthetic discussions on metafictionality in postmodernist literary representations of the world, and it also appears in technological discourses concerning computer-augmented human experience. The seminar will investigate selected contemporary novels and films (e.g., K. Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, J. Fowles’s The Magus, J. Winterson’s The Stone Gods, K. Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions, The Matrix, Black Mirror), tracing in them various dimensions of simulation: phantasmagoric, dystopian, metafictional, philosophical and ethical.

 

dr Justyna Fruzińska, America in the 19th Century

The seminar will be devoted to discussing different aspects of American culture in the 19th century: literature, painting, religion, philosophy, history, popular culture. It will combine discussion of literary and critical sources with watching and analyzing documentary films on various issues connected to 19th-century America.

  • We will read works by Romantic as well as realist writers (e.g. Emerson, Hawthorne, Brockden Brown, Beecher Stowe, Twain, Henry James);
  • we will see paintings by artists from Thomas Cole to John Singer Sargent;
  • we will try to understand new religious movements such as Mormons or Christian Science;
  • we will discuss major historical events of the 19th century: the war of 1812, slavery and abolitionism, the war with Mexico, the gold rush, the industrial revolution, Civil War and reconstruction of the South;
  • we will learn about dime novels, minstrel shows, and American folk heroes such as Buffalo Bill

Although the seminar will focus on the 19th century, I invite all students interested in the US; the range of possible BA topics accepted is far wider than the scope of the seminar, and theses dealing with any issues connected to American literature or popular culture are welcome.

 

dr Agnieszka Rasmus, British Cinema: Landscapes, Themes, Characters

Our seminar will focus on discussing examples of iconic British films from the 1960s to the present. We will discover different landscapes, from the cityscape of London to the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, and look at the way they shape and define our protagonists. We will mingle with aristocrats and the underclass, and accompany them on their journey of self-discovery in heart-warming comedies and gut-wrenching horrors.

If you wish to explore British film, its characters, themes and landscapes, then this seminar is for you.

 

dr Justyna Stępień, Cyborgs, Hybrids and Posthuman Bodies in the Anthropocene

This interdisciplinary seminar traces the ways in which our bodies might be better described as cyborgs, hybrids or the ‘posthuman.’ While examining our engagements with technology, biotechnology and our embodied relations to nonhuman animals and the material planet, the course addresses the notion of the posthuman which, in the contemporary debate, has become a key tool to the understanding the current conditions of the Anthropocene. Drawing on research and concepts from technology studies, feminist and queer theory, environmental and animal studies, we will work through specific examples – relating to reproductive technologies, pharmaceuticals, self-tracking, and animals in space amongst others – to think about who and what we are today. Along with short theoretical and literary essays, we will discuss films, visual art, Tv-series, videos, fashion and games.

 

dr Monika Kocot, Landscapes and Mindscapes in Contemporary Anglophone Literature

The seminar is addressed to all students interested in (cross-cultural) artistic practices which seek to question established cultural narratives concerning identity (of the text), nature, and religion.

The texts we’re going to discuss will foreground the issues of cognition, identity building, and narrative strategies that help us understand the real (and imagined) world(s). We will focus on three major genres/thematic categories:

  • experimental literature (mind-bending texts from the second avant-garde to the present)
  • nature writing (e.g. radical geopoetic approaches; deep time narratives; Zen-inspired literature; indigenous perspectives)
  • travel writing (nomadic subjects; deep time travel narratives)

Comparative approaches (British-Canadian, British-American literature, and intermediality) will be encouraged.

 

dr hab. Przemysław Krakowian, prof. UŁ, Topics in English Language Teaching

This BA diploma seminar is meant for students whose interest lie in the area of language teaching and who wish to write on a variety of topics within persistent issues in ELT in a modern school setting. While the instructor’s principal fields of activity are within the role of popular technology and media in language learning, new technologies in skill development and language assessment, students are welcome to pursue issues relevant to their personal interests within the scope EFL. In terms of their research projects, the students will be provided, where possible, with access to data-sets and relevant research methodology and research support will be provided to those pursuing their own projects.

 

dr Łukasz Salski, Foreign Language Education and Written Communication

This class is intended for anyone interested in language teaching and learning. While most of the input will revolve around theoretical and practical aspects of teaching writing in English as a foreign language, students will be encouraged to pursue their specific interests in the broad field of teaching and learning foreign/second language. Ultimately, the BA diploma project topics may vary from teaching different language skills or subsystems to individual language learner differences or assessment, and from analysis of language teaching techniques or materials to investigation of learning strategies or bilingualism.

 

dr hab. Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, prof. UŁ / dr Anna Gralińska-Brawata, Analysing how people do things with words and the variability in English (different varieties)

The aim of the seminar is to acquaint students with a variety of factors influencing the use of English and ways of investigating the functions of language and variability in speech from the sociolinguistic point of view focusing on the interaction between form and function. The seminar aims at inspiring and preparing students for conducting a research project as part of their B.A. thesis.
Course content: The course will focus on important issues concerning various sources of variability in language use including a range of sociolinguistic variables (e.g. age, gender, ethnicity, social status, identity, speaking styles) and language (including its phonetic features, e.g. dialect and accent differences) in different contexts of use (e.g. professional or private interaction, advertising, mediated contexts, language of the classroom). These will be based on close analyses of selected audio-visual materials or texts.

 

dr Aleksandra Majdzińska-Koczorowicz, Issues in linguistic analysis

In this seminar students will have the opportunity to investigate the language of newspapers, advertising, and politics in order to be able to specify their area of linguistic interest. It aims at offering an insight into various concepts concerning both written discourse and visual aspects, such as distribution of information, 'figuarative language’ (metaphor, metonymy, personification, etc.), framing, distribution of attention (e.g. figure and ground distinction), etc. A focus will also be placed on persuasive language, including presenting arguments, techniques of manipulation/propaganda, personalising strategies, etc.

In this seminar students will have the opportunity to investigate the language of newspapers, advertising, and politics in order to be able to specify their area of linguistic interest. It aims at offering an insight into various concepts concerning written discourse, such as distribution of information, 'figuarative language’ (metaphor, metonymy, personification, etc.), framing, distribution of attention (e.g. figure and ground distinction). A focus will also be placed on persuasive language, including presenting arguments, techniques of manipulation/propaganda, personalising strategies, etc.

W dniach 24-26 września odbędzie się rejestracja na zajęcia elektywne (fakultatywne) dla III roku studiów licencjackich.
Rejestracja odbędzie się przez system USOS. Rozpocznie się 24 września o godz. 19:00 i zakończy 26 września o godz. 23:59.

Wszyscy studenci wybierają po jednej grupie następujących zajęć (łącznie 2 zajęcia):
Zajęcia fakultatywne A (wtorki 13:30)
Zajęcia fakultatywne B (czwartki 10:00)

Wybierane grupy identyfikowane są nazwiskiem prowadzącego (przy zajęciach dr Shauny O’Brien brak nazwiska prowadzącej – tak można je zidentyfikować). W grupach obowiązują limity miejsc. W przypadku wyczerpania się limitu miejsc prosimy o zapisanie się do innej grupy.

Prosimy zapoznać się z krótkimi opisami ww. kursów:


ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE A (wtorek 13.30-15)

prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, A Literary Tutorial in Anglophone Fantastic Literature
The tutorial is, generally speaking, focused on (mainly anglophone) fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) in its historical development, starting with the Gothic novel and ending with the late 20th c. fantasy literature. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres, including film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.

dr hab. prof UŁ Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, Speech acts and actions: What language is for
The course introduces a functional perspective on language in which acts of speech are seen as actions in the social world. We will shortly revise models of communication focused on functions of language (e.g. Aristotle, Jakobson, J.L. Austin’s speech act theory) and demonstrate though exercises how such models can be used in analysis of natural language (how people persuade and dissuade, make others believe or doubt things, how they compliment and intimidate). We will consider literal language and different types of suggested meanings (presupposed, implicated, etc. meanings).

dr Tomasz Fisiak, (Pop)Cultural Gothic
The aim of the class is to analyse selected aspects of Gothicism as a (pop)cultural phenomenon, with a particular focus on its impact on the widely understood visual and aural sphere (cinema, music/video). Students will be acquainted with the concepts of intertextuality, interpictoriality and transmediality, among others, to discuss a range of Gothic-inspired films and music videos. Assessment will be based upon two major tasks, i.e. a movie review and a presentation on a music video of one’s choice, as well as active participation in the discussions throughout the semester.

dr Małgorzata Hołda, The Phenomenon of Being-in-the-world in the Literary Works of British Modernism
The aim of this course is to reflect on how the most famous writers of British modernism explore the phenomenon of our being-in-the-world. The problematic under discussion will embrace such categories as beauty and truth, time, female/male dichotomy, authenticity, solitude, contemplative and calculative thinking. The reflection on the above-mentioned topics will be done from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective. Paying special attention to the intersections of literature, philosophy, and visual arts: painting and photography, the course program endeavors to sensitize students to liminal areas, points of indeterminacy, and that which is viewed as marginal.
The schedule will encompass the following, detailed topics: the relationship between beauty (kalon) and truth (aletheia), the coexistence and co-influence of the visual and the verbal arts, female artists and the disavowal of patriarchy (Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, and the Bloomsbury group), the interconnections of literature and psychoanalysis (Virginia Woolf), creative competition and authenticity (Woolf and Katherine Mansfield), time, contemplative thinking, and the notion of epiphany in literature (James Joyce) and philosophy (St. Paul, Luther, Duns Scotus, Heidegger), existential void, loneliness, and confusion (the poetic narration of T. S. Eliot), and others. Since the course prompts the development of effective communication on a vast and diverse range of literary topics it will focus on tutor-to-student and student-to-student interaction with the use of British Library online readings and other resources as a creative stimulus. To receive a positive grade, students are obliged to actively participate in classes and to give a talk and/or write an essay on a topic selected from the list of proposals.

prof. dr hab. Piotr Stalmaszczyk, Language Contact in the British Isles
The aim of this course is twofold: first, it will discuss and analyse patterns of language contact in general, and in the British Isles in particular; second, the seminar will present selected items in the linguistic history of the British Isles. Language contact will be investigated within the historical and contemporary processes in the British Isles (concentrating especially on the Celtic languages and the Celtic Englishes).

The following issues will be discussed in more detail: understanding language contact; Celtic peoples, their history, culture, literatures and languages; history of Celtic languages; decline of the Celtic languages; informal introduction to Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh; language revival (especially the case of Cornish and Manx) and recent developments; sociolinguistic issues in the history of Celtic languages; problems of defining and delimiting language and dialect; Celtic influence on English vocabulary.
The course provides an opportunity for comparing and contrasting languages and linguistic structures (English/Irish within the Indo-European context). The course is accessible to students intending to specialise in language/linguistics and literature/culture.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Global Shakespeares: Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in different global contexts.
Shakespeare’s plays have been translated into over 100 languages and been performed for a variety of audiences across the globe. This course will examine a selection of these global adaptations, from literary reinterpretations of the plays to film adaptations. Students will explore the various routes along which Shakespeare’s plays have travelled across the world and how these routes have been shaped by social, political, and cultural influences. This course will seek to shed light on the complex interplay of local and global factors that have helped Shakespeare become the global phenomenon he is today. In addition to Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello and Macbeth, we will also look at a selection of stage and screen adaptations of these plays. Texts for this course include Sulayman Al-Bassam’s Al-Hamlet Summit, Tom Stoppard’s Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, and Paula Vogel’s Desdemona, a play about a handkerchief. Students will be required to submit an essay at the end of the semester.


ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE B (czwartek 10-11.30)

dr hab. Małgorzata Myk, Highlights of 20th & 21st century North American experimental women’s writing.
The focus of this course is present-day avant-garde writing by North American female authors. We will be analyzing a selection of representative texts that challenge literary norms and genre conventions in ways that interrogate different aspects of culture and politics. We will also re-examine the concept of form as always inextricably related to writing’s content. Apart from reading literary texts, we will also look at relevant excerpts from influential critical and theoretical pieces that help to situate writers in contexts from which their works have been evolving. Our reflection on the texts will be also enhanced by visual resources that help to grasp these works’ material aspect.

dr Anna Wieczorek, Studying meaning and persuasion
The purpose of the course is to familiarise students with semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies of meaning and persuasion. In class, students will be involved in hands-on tasks in which they will rely on Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), an approach to studying language as a social and political tool. This course aims to acquaint students with current trends in semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies in language and the main trends in linguistic analysis of discourse.
The course will cover the following topics to investigate various persuasion strategies in discourse: semantics and semantic relations; pragmatics (speech acts, presupposition, implicature); cognitive linguistics (conceptual metaphor, conceptual mapping); Critical Discourse Analysis.

prof. dr hab. Wit Pietrzak, Monsters within, monsters without
Who doesn’t enjoy getting a glimpse into the workings of a terrifically twisted mind? The course will explore various portrayals of monstrosity, from a raging blood-thirsty vampire (NOT Twilight, because again @#$% Twilight), through a raging blood-thirsty sociopathic murderer, all the way to, you guessed it, a raging blood-thirsty physician. With scant attention to genres (there will be novels, both graphic and the old school, there will be poems, there will be films, there will be blood) or periods (though post-WWII is to be expected most of the time), we will investigate the trials of tribulations of all manner of lunatics on the rampage and sympathise with their helpless victims. And yet, despite the admittedly dreary climes that our sojourns will take us to, one can’t rule out a laugh or two. 

dr hab. prof UŁ, Piotr Pęzik, Introduction to Corpus-based Authorship Attribution
This course is a gentle introduction to idiolect studies and corpus-drive authorship attribution. Idiolect can be defined as the language variety of an individual. Authorship attribution (AA) is „the process in which linguists set out to identify the author(s) of disputed, anonymous or questioned texts” (Coulthard et al. 2016). Authorship attribution and idiolect studies are an important aspect of forensic linguistics. As part of the course we will consider a number of qualitative, computational-quantitative AA methods and explore idiolect corpora in search of co-selection sets which can uniquely identify authors in online and casual communication.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Documentary Theatre in Britain
Documentary Theatre is a genre of theatre that uses sources found outside a theatrical context (such as interviews, reports, or journals) as the raw material for a dramatic performance. In Britain, theatremakers have used the form to address some of the most divisive social and political issues in recent decades. Institutional racism in the police, the invasion of Iraq, serial killings, and
terrorism have all been addressed by theatremakers using this documentary approach. At the same time, the use of documentary techniques can afford a degree of anonymity that can be used by playwrights to present more personal testimony on the stage. This course will explore a variety of these British documentary plays, from verbatim musicals to works that criticise and seek to deconstruct the documentary form. Students will examine how documentary materials are collected, edited and staged by theatremakers, and interrogate the ethics of these different approaches. Works that will be discussed include Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s London Road, David Hare’s The Permanent Way, Richard Taylor-Norton’s The Colour of Justice, and Dennis Kelly’s Taking
Care of Baby among others. The course will be examined by an essay at the end of the semester

 

Zapraszamy wszystkich studentów I roku na spotkania informacyjne w trakcie których przekażemy Państwu istotne informacje dotyczące organizacji semestru zimowego i uczestnictwa w zajęciach.

Spotkania odbędą się:

  • dla studiów I stopnia: w środę 29 września o godzinie 10:00 w auli A1
  • dla studiów II stopnia: w środę 29 września o godzinie 11:15 w auli A1

Na spotkaniu dla studentów II stopnia omówione zostaną istotne kwestie związane ze specjalnością nauczycielską.

Podczas spotkań obowiązuje reżim sanitarny – prosimy o przyjście w maskach ochronnych i zachowanie dystansu społecznego. Spotkanie zaczniemy, gdy wszyscy zajmą miejsca, więc prosimy o spokojne oczekiwanie na możliwość wejścia do auli i bez niepotrzebnego tłoczenia się przy drzwiach. Studentów o nazwiskach rozpoczynających się od A-K prosimy o wchodzenie wejściem na poziomie -1, pozostałych zapraszamy do wejścia na poziomie 0.