ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE A (wtorek 13.30-15)

prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, A Literary Tutorial in Anglophone Fantastic Literature
The tutorial is, generally speaking, focused on (mainly anglophone) fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) in its historical development, starting with the Gothic novel and ending with the late 20th c. fantasy literature. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres, including film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.

dr hab. prof UŁ Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, Speech acts and actions: What language is for
The course introduces a functional perspective on language in which acts of speech are seen as actions in the social world. We will shortly revise models of communication focused on functions of language (e.g. Aristotle, Jakobson, J.L. Austin’s speech act theory) and demonstrate though exercises how such models can be used in analysis of natural language (how people persuade and dissuade, make others believe or doubt things, how they compliment and intimidate). We will consider literal language and different types of suggested meanings (presupposed, implicated, etc. meanings).

dr Tomasz Fisiak, (Pop)Cultural Gothic
The aim of the class is to analyse selected aspects of Gothicism as a (pop)cultural phenomenon, with a particular focus on its impact on the widely understood visual and aural sphere (cinema, music/video). Students will be acquainted with the concepts of intertextuality, interpictoriality and transmediality, among others, to discuss a range of Gothic-inspired films and music videos. Assessment will be based upon two major tasks, i.e. a movie review and a presentation on a music video of one’s choice, as well as active participation in the discussions throughout the semester.

dr Małgorzata Hołda, The Phenomenon of Being-in-the-world in the Literary Works of British Modernism
The aim of this course is to reflect on how the most famous writers of British modernism explore the phenomenon of our being-in-the-world. The problematic under discussion will embrace such categories as beauty and truth, time, female/male dichotomy, authenticity, solitude, contemplative and calculative thinking. The reflection on the above-mentioned topics will be done from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective. Paying special attention to the intersections of literature, philosophy, and visual arts: painting and photography, the course program endeavors to sensitize students to liminal areas, points of indeterminacy, and that which is viewed as marginal.
The schedule will encompass the following, detailed topics: the relationship between beauty (kalon) and truth (aletheia), the coexistence and co-influence of the visual and the verbal arts, female artists and the disavowal of patriarchy (Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, and the Bloomsbury group), the interconnections of literature and psychoanalysis (Virginia Woolf), creative competition and authenticity (Woolf and Katherine Mansfield), time, contemplative thinking, and the notion of epiphany in literature (James Joyce) and philosophy (St. Paul, Luther, Duns Scotus, Heidegger), existential void, loneliness, and confusion (the poetic narration of T. S. Eliot), and others. Since the course prompts the development of effective communication on a vast and diverse range of literary topics it will focus on tutor-to-student and student-to-student interaction with the use of British Library online readings and other resources as a creative stimulus. To receive a positive grade, students are obliged to actively participate in classes and to give a talk and/or write an essay on a topic selected from the list of proposals.

prof. dr hab. Piotr Stalmaszczyk, Language Contact in the British Isles
The aim of this course is twofold: first, it will discuss and analyse patterns of language contact in general, and in the British Isles in particular; second, the seminar will present selected items in the linguistic history of the British Isles. Language contact will be investigated within the historical and contemporary processes in the British Isles (concentrating especially on the Celtic languages and the Celtic Englishes).
The following issues will be discussed in more detail: understanding language contact; Celtic peoples, their history, culture, literatures and languages; history of Celtic languages; decline of the Celtic languages; informal introduction to Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh; language revival (especially the case of Cornish and Manx) and recent developments; sociolinguistic issues in the history of Celtic languages; problems of defining and delimiting language and dialect; Celtic influence on English vocabulary.
The course provides an opportunity for comparing and contrasting languages and linguistic structures (English/Irish within the Indo-European context). The course is accessible to students intending to specialise in language/linguistics and literature/culture.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Global Shakespeares: Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in different global contexts.
Shakespeare’s plays have been translated into over 100 languages and been performed for a variety of audiences across the globe. This course will examine a selection of these global adaptations, from literary reinterpretations of the plays to film adaptations. Students will explore the various routes along which Shakespeare’s plays have travelled across the world and how these routes have been shaped by social, political, and cultural influences. This course will seek to shed light on the complex interplay of local and global factors that have helped Shakespeare become the global phenomenon he is today. In addition to Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello and Macbeth, we will also look at a selection of stage and screen adaptations of these plays. Texts for this course include Sulayman Al-Bassam’s Al-Hamlet Summit, Tom Stoppard’s Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, and Paula Vogel’s Desdemona, a play about a handkerchief. Students will be required to submit an essay at the end of the semester.


ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE B (czwartek 10-11.30)

dr hab. Małgorzata Myk, Highlights of 20th & 21st century North American experimental women’s writing.
The focus of this course is present-day avant-garde writing by North American female authors. We will be analyzing a selection of representative texts that challenge literary norms and genre conventions in ways that interrogate different aspects of culture and politics. We will also re-examine the concept of form as always inextricably related to writing’s content. Apart from reading literary texts, we will also look at relevant excerpts from influential critical and theoretical pieces that help to situate writers in contexts from which their works have been evolving. Our reflection on the texts will be also enhanced by visual resources that help to grasp these works’ material aspect.

dr Anna Wieczorek, Studying meaning and persuasion
The purpose of the course is to familiarise students with semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies of meaning and persuasion. In class, students will be involved in hands-on tasks in which they will rely on Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), an approach to studying language as a social and political tool. This course aims to acquaint students with current trends in semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies in language and the main trends in linguistic analysis of discourse.

The course will cover the following topics to investigate various persuasion strategies in discourse: semantics and semantic relations; pragmatics (speech acts, presupposition, implicature); cognitive linguistics (conceptual metaphor, conceptual mapping); Critical Discourse Analysis.

prof. dr hab. Wit Pietrzak, Monsters within, monsters without
Who doesn’t enjoy getting a glimpse into the workings of a terrifically twisted mind? The course will explore various portrayals of monstrosity, from a raging blood-thirsty vampire (NOT Twilight, because again @#$% Twilight), through a raging blood-thirsty sociopathic murderer, all the way to, you guessed it, a raging blood-thirsty physician. With scant attention to genres (there will be novels, both graphic and the old school, there will be poems, there will be films, there will be blood) or periods (though post-WWII is to be expected most of the time), we will investigate the trials of tribulations of all manner of lunatics on the rampage and sympathise with their helpless victims. And yet, despite the admittedly dreary climes that our sojourns will take us to, one can’t rule out a laugh or two. 

dr hab. prof UŁ, Piotr Pęzik, Introduction to Corpus-based Authorship Attribution
This course is a gentle introduction to idiolect studies and corpus-drive authorship attribution. Idiolect can be defined as the language variety of an individual. Authorship attribution (AA) is „the process in which linguists set out to identify the author(s) of disputed, anonymous or questioned texts” (Coulthard et al. 2016). Authorship attribution and idiolect studies are an important aspect of forensic linguistics. As part of the course we will consider a number of qualitative, computational-quantitative AA methods and explore idiolect corpora in search of co-selection sets which can uniquely identify authors in online and casual communication.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Documentary Theatre in Britain
Documentary Theatre is a genre of theatre that uses sources found outside a theatrical context (such as interviews, reports, or journals) as the raw material for a dramatic performance. In Britain, theatremakers have used the form to address some of the most divisive social and political issues in recent decades. Institutional racism in the police, the invasion of Iraq, serial killings, and
terrorism have all been addressed by theatremakers using this documentary approach. At the same time, the use of documentary techniques can afford a degree of anonymity that can be used by playwrights to present more personal testimony on the stage. This course will explore a variety of these British documentary plays, from verbatim musicals to works that criticise and seek to deconstruct the documentary form. Students will examine how documentary materials are collected, edited and staged by theatremakers, and interrogate the ethics of these different approaches. Works that will be discussed include Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s London Road, David Hare’s The Permanent Way, Richard Taylor-Norton’s The Colour of Justice, and Dennis Kelly’s Taking
Care of Baby among others. The course will be examined by an essay at the end of the semester

 

dr hab. Mikołaj Deckert, prof. UŁ, Audiovisual Translation

The BA seminar covers the basic theoretical and practical notions of Audiovisual Translation, or Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility. Students will get to know different research methods and tools that can be productively used in their BA projects. An important objective is to make participants aware of the idiosyncrasies of particular AVT modes, and enable participants to identify factors that influence the translator’s decisions, for instance in the context of translation quality assessment.

The seminar will also focus on the very process of planning, structuring and writing the BA thesis – discussing issues like data types, data selection and collection, hypothesis formulation, referencing, register, and text editing.

 

Dr hab. Tomasz Dobrogoszcz, prof. UŁ, Constructed worlds/simulated realities

According to the French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, the author of the theory of the simulacra, we all constantly live in a virtual reality. Our experience of the world is necessarily mediated and indirect, it is an illusion which we accept as truth, for lack of better options. What is more, we often lose the ability to distinguish between the real and the representation, or we even consider a copy as “more real” than the reality. The issue of simulated reality features in philosophical disputes on the nature of existence, it resonates in aesthetic discussions on metafictionality in postmodernist literary representations of the world, and it also appears in technological discourses concerning computer-augmented human experience. The seminar will investigate selected contemporary novels and films (e.g., K. Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, J. Fowles’s The Magus, J. Winterson’s The Stone Gods, K. Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions, The Matrix, Black Mirror), tracing in them various dimensions of simulation: phantasmagoric, dystopian, metafictional, philosophical and ethical.

 

dr Justyna Fruzińska, America in the 19th Century

The seminar will be devoted to discussing different aspects of American culture in the 19th century: literature, painting, religion, philosophy, history, popular culture. It will combine discussion of literary and critical sources with watching and analyzing documentary films on various issues connected to 19th-century America.

  • We will read works by Romantic as well as realist writers (e.g. Emerson, Hawthorne, Brockden Brown, Beecher Stowe, Twain, Henry James);
  • we will see paintings by artists from Thomas Cole to John Singer Sargent;
  • we will try to understand new religious movements such as Mormons or Christian Science;
  • we will discuss major historical events of the 19th century: the war of 1812, slavery and abolitionism, the war with Mexico, the gold rush, the industrial revolution, Civil War and reconstruction of the South;
  • we will learn about dime novels, minstrel shows, and American folk heroes such as Buffalo Bill

Although the seminar will focus on the 19th century, I invite all students interested in the US; the range of possible BA topics accepted is far wider than the scope of the seminar, and theses dealing with any issues connected to American literature or popular culture are welcome.

 

dr Agnieszka Rasmus, British Cinema: Landscapes, Themes, Characters

Our seminar will focus on discussing examples of iconic British films from the 1960s to the present. We will discover different landscapes, from the cityscape of London to the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, and look at the way they shape and define our protagonists. We will mingle with aristocrats and the underclass, and accompany them on their journey of self-discovery in heart-warming comedies and gut-wrenching horrors.

If you wish to explore British film, its characters, themes and landscapes, then this seminar is for you.

 

dr Justyna Stępień, Cyborgs, Hybrids and Posthuman Bodies in the Anthropocene

This interdisciplinary seminar traces the ways in which our bodies might be better described as cyborgs, hybrids or the ‘posthuman.’ While examining our engagements with technology, biotechnology and our embodied relations to nonhuman animals and the material planet, the course addresses the notion of the posthuman which, in the contemporary debate, has become a key tool to the understanding the current conditions of the Anthropocene. Drawing on research and concepts from technology studies, feminist and queer theory, environmental and animal studies, we will work through specific examples – relating to reproductive technologies, pharmaceuticals, self-tracking, and animals in space amongst others – to think about who and what we are today. Along with short theoretical and literary essays, we will discuss films, visual art, Tv-series, videos, fashion and games.

 

dr Monika Kocot, Landscapes and Mindscapes in Contemporary Anglophone Literature

The seminar is addressed to all students interested in (cross-cultural) artistic practices which seek to question established cultural narratives concerning identity (of the text), nature, and religion.

The texts we’re going to discuss will foreground the issues of cognition, identity building, and narrative strategies that help us understand the real (and imagined) world(s). We will focus on three major genres/thematic categories:

  • experimental literature (mind-bending texts from the second avant-garde to the present)
  • nature writing (e.g. radical geopoetic approaches; deep time narratives; Zen-inspired literature; indigenous perspectives)
  • travel writing (nomadic subjects; deep time travel narratives)

Comparative approaches (British-Canadian, British-American literature, and intermediality) will be encouraged.

 

dr hab. Przemysław Krakowian, prof. UŁ, Topics in English Language Teaching

This BA diploma seminar is meant for students whose interest lie in the area of language teaching and who wish to write on a variety of topics within persistent issues in ELT in a modern school setting. While the instructor’s principal fields of activity are within the role of popular technology and media in language learning, new technologies in skill development and language assessment, students are welcome to pursue issues relevant to their personal interests within the scope EFL. In terms of their research projects, the students will be provided, where possible, with access to data-sets and relevant research methodology and research support will be provided to those pursuing their own projects.

 

dr Łukasz Salski, Foreign Language Education and Written Communication

This class is intended for anyone interested in language teaching and learning. While most of the input will revolve around theoretical and practical aspects of teaching writing in English as a foreign language, students will be encouraged to pursue their specific interests in the broad field of teaching and learning foreign/second language. Ultimately, the BA diploma project topics may vary from teaching different language skills or subsystems to individual language learner differences or assessment, and from analysis of language teaching techniques or materials to investigation of learning strategies or bilingualism.

 

dr hab. Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, prof. UŁ / dr Anna Gralińska-Brawata, Analysing how people do things with words and the variability in English (different varieties)

The aim of the seminar is to acquaint students with a variety of factors influencing the use of English and ways of investigating the functions of language and variability in speech from the sociolinguistic point of view focusing on the interaction between form and function. The seminar aims at inspiring and preparing students for conducting a research project as part of their B.A. thesis.
Course content: The course will focus on important issues concerning various sources of variability in language use including a range of sociolinguistic variables (e.g. age, gender, ethnicity, social status, identity, speaking styles) and language (including its phonetic features, e.g. dialect and accent differences) in different contexts of use (e.g. professional or private interaction, advertising, mediated contexts, language of the classroom). These will be based on close analyses of selected audio-visual materials or texts.

 

dr Aleksandra Majdzińska-Koczorowicz, Issues in linguistic analysis

In this seminar students will have the opportunity to investigate the language of newspapers, advertising, and politics in order to be able to specify their area of linguistic interest. It aims at offering an insight into various concepts concerning both written discourse and visual aspects, such as distribution of information, 'figuarative language' (metaphor, metonymy, personification, etc.), framing, distribution of attention (e.g. figure and ground distinction), etc. A focus will also be placed on persuasive language, including presenting arguments, techniques of manipulation/propaganda, personalising strategies, etc.

In this seminar students will have the opportunity to investigate the language of newspapers, advertising, and politics in order to be able to specify their area of linguistic interest. It aims at offering an insight into various concepts concerning written discourse, such as distribution of information, 'figuarative language' (metaphor, metonymy, personification, etc.), framing, distribution of attention (e.g. figure and ground distinction). A focus will also be placed on persuasive language, including presenting arguments, techniques of manipulation/propaganda, personalising strategies, etc.

W dniach 24-26 września odbędzie się rejestracja na zajęcia elektywne (fakultatywne) dla III roku studiów licencjackich.
Rejestracja odbędzie się przez system USOS. Rozpocznie się 24 września o godz. 19:00 i zakończy 26 września o godz. 23:59.

Wszyscy studenci wybierają po jednej grupie następujących zajęć (łącznie 2 zajęcia):
Zajęcia fakultatywne A (wtorki 13:30)
Zajęcia fakultatywne B (czwartki 10:00)

Wybierane grupy identyfikowane są nazwiskiem prowadzącego (przy zajęciach dr Shauny O’Brien brak nazwiska prowadzącej – tak można je zidentyfikować). W grupach obowiązują limity miejsc. W przypadku wyczerpania się limitu miejsc prosimy o zapisanie się do innej grupy.

Prosimy zapoznać się z krótkimi opisami ww. kursów:


ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE A (wtorek 13.30-15)

prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, A Literary Tutorial in Anglophone Fantastic Literature
The tutorial is, generally speaking, focused on (mainly anglophone) fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) in its historical development, starting with the Gothic novel and ending with the late 20th c. fantasy literature. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres, including film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.

dr hab. prof UŁ Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, Speech acts and actions: What language is for
The course introduces a functional perspective on language in which acts of speech are seen as actions in the social world. We will shortly revise models of communication focused on functions of language (e.g. Aristotle, Jakobson, J.L. Austin’s speech act theory) and demonstrate though exercises how such models can be used in analysis of natural language (how people persuade and dissuade, make others believe or doubt things, how they compliment and intimidate). We will consider literal language and different types of suggested meanings (presupposed, implicated, etc. meanings).

dr Tomasz Fisiak, (Pop)Cultural Gothic
The aim of the class is to analyse selected aspects of Gothicism as a (pop)cultural phenomenon, with a particular focus on its impact on the widely understood visual and aural sphere (cinema, music/video). Students will be acquainted with the concepts of intertextuality, interpictoriality and transmediality, among others, to discuss a range of Gothic-inspired films and music videos. Assessment will be based upon two major tasks, i.e. a movie review and a presentation on a music video of one’s choice, as well as active participation in the discussions throughout the semester.

dr Małgorzata Hołda, The Phenomenon of Being-in-the-world in the Literary Works of British Modernism
The aim of this course is to reflect on how the most famous writers of British modernism explore the phenomenon of our being-in-the-world. The problematic under discussion will embrace such categories as beauty and truth, time, female/male dichotomy, authenticity, solitude, contemplative and calculative thinking. The reflection on the above-mentioned topics will be done from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective. Paying special attention to the intersections of literature, philosophy, and visual arts: painting and photography, the course program endeavors to sensitize students to liminal areas, points of indeterminacy, and that which is viewed as marginal.
The schedule will encompass the following, detailed topics: the relationship between beauty (kalon) and truth (aletheia), the coexistence and co-influence of the visual and the verbal arts, female artists and the disavowal of patriarchy (Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, and the Bloomsbury group), the interconnections of literature and psychoanalysis (Virginia Woolf), creative competition and authenticity (Woolf and Katherine Mansfield), time, contemplative thinking, and the notion of epiphany in literature (James Joyce) and philosophy (St. Paul, Luther, Duns Scotus, Heidegger), existential void, loneliness, and confusion (the poetic narration of T. S. Eliot), and others. Since the course prompts the development of effective communication on a vast and diverse range of literary topics it will focus on tutor-to-student and student-to-student interaction with the use of British Library online readings and other resources as a creative stimulus. To receive a positive grade, students are obliged to actively participate in classes and to give a talk and/or write an essay on a topic selected from the list of proposals.

prof. dr hab. Piotr Stalmaszczyk, Language Contact in the British Isles
The aim of this course is twofold: first, it will discuss and analyse patterns of language contact in general, and in the British Isles in particular; second, the seminar will present selected items in the linguistic history of the British Isles. Language contact will be investigated within the historical and contemporary processes in the British Isles (concentrating especially on the Celtic languages and the Celtic Englishes).

The following issues will be discussed in more detail: understanding language contact; Celtic peoples, their history, culture, literatures and languages; history of Celtic languages; decline of the Celtic languages; informal introduction to Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Welsh; language revival (especially the case of Cornish and Manx) and recent developments; sociolinguistic issues in the history of Celtic languages; problems of defining and delimiting language and dialect; Celtic influence on English vocabulary.
The course provides an opportunity for comparing and contrasting languages and linguistic structures (English/Irish within the Indo-European context). The course is accessible to students intending to specialise in language/linguistics and literature/culture.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Global Shakespeares: Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in different global contexts.
Shakespeare’s plays have been translated into over 100 languages and been performed for a variety of audiences across the globe. This course will examine a selection of these global adaptations, from literary reinterpretations of the plays to film adaptations. Students will explore the various routes along which Shakespeare’s plays have travelled across the world and how these routes have been shaped by social, political, and cultural influences. This course will seek to shed light on the complex interplay of local and global factors that have helped Shakespeare become the global phenomenon he is today. In addition to Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello and Macbeth, we will also look at a selection of stage and screen adaptations of these plays. Texts for this course include Sulayman Al-Bassam’s Al-Hamlet Summit, Tom Stoppard’s Dogg’s Hamlet, Cahoot’s Macbeth, and Paula Vogel’s Desdemona, a play about a handkerchief. Students will be required to submit an essay at the end of the semester.


ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE B (czwartek 10-11.30)

dr hab. Małgorzata Myk, Highlights of 20th & 21st century North American experimental women’s writing.
The focus of this course is present-day avant-garde writing by North American female authors. We will be analyzing a selection of representative texts that challenge literary norms and genre conventions in ways that interrogate different aspects of culture and politics. We will also re-examine the concept of form as always inextricably related to writing’s content. Apart from reading literary texts, we will also look at relevant excerpts from influential critical and theoretical pieces that help to situate writers in contexts from which their works have been evolving. Our reflection on the texts will be also enhanced by visual resources that help to grasp these works’ material aspect.

dr Anna Wieczorek, Studying meaning and persuasion
The purpose of the course is to familiarise students with semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies of meaning and persuasion. In class, students will be involved in hands-on tasks in which they will rely on Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), an approach to studying language as a social and political tool. This course aims to acquaint students with current trends in semantic, pragmatic, and cognitive studies in language and the main trends in linguistic analysis of discourse.
The course will cover the following topics to investigate various persuasion strategies in discourse: semantics and semantic relations; pragmatics (speech acts, presupposition, implicature); cognitive linguistics (conceptual metaphor, conceptual mapping); Critical Discourse Analysis.

prof. dr hab. Wit Pietrzak, Monsters within, monsters without
Who doesn’t enjoy getting a glimpse into the workings of a terrifically twisted mind? The course will explore various portrayals of monstrosity, from a raging blood-thirsty vampire (NOT Twilight, because again @#$% Twilight), through a raging blood-thirsty sociopathic murderer, all the way to, you guessed it, a raging blood-thirsty physician. With scant attention to genres (there will be novels, both graphic and the old school, there will be poems, there will be films, there will be blood) or periods (though post-WWII is to be expected most of the time), we will investigate the trials of tribulations of all manner of lunatics on the rampage and sympathise with their helpless victims. And yet, despite the admittedly dreary climes that our sojourns will take us to, one can’t rule out a laugh or two. 

dr hab. prof UŁ, Piotr Pęzik, Introduction to Corpus-based Authorship Attribution
This course is a gentle introduction to idiolect studies and corpus-drive authorship attribution. Idiolect can be defined as the language variety of an individual. Authorship attribution (AA) is „the process in which linguists set out to identify the author(s) of disputed, anonymous or questioned texts” (Coulthard et al. 2016). Authorship attribution and idiolect studies are an important aspect of forensic linguistics. As part of the course we will consider a number of qualitative, computational-quantitative AA methods and explore idiolect corpora in search of co-selection sets which can uniquely identify authors in online and casual communication.

dr Shauna O’Brien, Documentary Theatre in Britain
Documentary Theatre is a genre of theatre that uses sources found outside a theatrical context (such as interviews, reports, or journals) as the raw material for a dramatic performance. In Britain, theatremakers have used the form to address some of the most divisive social and political issues in recent decades. Institutional racism in the police, the invasion of Iraq, serial killings, and
terrorism have all been addressed by theatremakers using this documentary approach. At the same time, the use of documentary techniques can afford a degree of anonymity that can be used by playwrights to present more personal testimony on the stage. This course will explore a variety of these British documentary plays, from verbatim musicals to works that criticise and seek to deconstruct the documentary form. Students will examine how documentary materials are collected, edited and staged by theatremakers, and interrogate the ethics of these different approaches. Works that will be discussed include Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s London Road, David Hare’s The Permanent Way, Richard Taylor-Norton’s The Colour of Justice, and Dennis Kelly’s Taking
Care of Baby among others. The course will be examined by an essay at the end of the semester

 

Zapraszamy wszystkich studentów I roku na spotkania informacyjne w trakcie których przekażemy Państwu istotne informacje dotyczące organizacji semestru zimowego i uczestnictwa w zajęciach.

Spotkania odbędą się:

  • dla studiów I stopnia: w środę 29 września o godzinie 10:00 w auli A1
  • dla studiów II stopnia: w środę 29 września o godzinie 11:15 w auli A1

Na spotkaniu dla studentów II stopnia omówione zostaną istotne kwestie związane ze specjalnością nauczycielską.

Podczas spotkań obowiązuje reżim sanitarny – prosimy o przyjście w maskach ochronnych i zachowanie dystansu społecznego. Spotkanie zaczniemy, gdy wszyscy zajmą miejsca, więc prosimy o spokojne oczekiwanie na możliwość wejścia do auli i bez niepotrzebnego tłoczenia się przy drzwiach. Studentów o nazwiskach rozpoczynających się od A-K prosimy o wchodzenie wejściem na poziomie -1, pozostałych zapraszamy do wejścia na poziomie 0.

Szanowni Państwo

Ambasada USA wraz z InterAlia, naukowo recenzowanym czasopismem zajmującym się teorią queer, zapraszają w piątek 20 listopada o godz. 18:00 na dyskusję online z Markiem Segalem, amerykańskim aktywistą i pionierem ruchu LGBT, uczestnikiem buntu Stonewall w 1969 r. Spotkanie odbędzie się w j. angielskim. Prosimy o rejestrację tutaj:  https://bit.ly/2Im180B

Mark Segal opowie o swoim uczestnictwie w uważanym za początek ruchu LGBT buncie Stonewall – serii protestów członków społeczności LGBT w odpowiedzi na nalot policji na bar Stonewall Inn w dzielnicy Greenwich Village w Nowym Jorku w 1969 roku. Podzieli się on również swoim pięćdziesięcioletnim doświadczeniem walki na rzecz praw osób LGBT, doświadczeniem niebagatelnym, jako że Mark Segal jest uznawany za jednego z najbardziej wpływowych aktywistów na rzecz równouprawnienia w historii Stanów Zjednoczonych.

Mark Segal był członkiem założycielem Gay Liberation Front, założycielem Gay Youth i członkiem The Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day Committee, organizacji, która zorganizowała pierwszą Gay Pride w 1970 r.  Najbardziej słynie z kampanii na rzecz widoczności osób LGBT w wiadomościach i programach telewizyjnych, która polegała na tym, że przerywał programy na żywo poprzez wtargnięcie do studia. Mark Segal jest również założycielem i wydawcą ‘Philadelphia Gay News’ oraz autorem wspomnień pt. “And Then I Danced: traveling the road to LGBT equality” (2015). 

Zapraszamy do obejrzenia krótkiego wideo o Marku Segalu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCFwOJcMjM0  

A tutaj dłuższy film o znaczeniu Stonewall: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjRv7dJTync

To spotkanie jest częścią organizowanej przez Ambasadę USA serii poświęconej ruchom i ludziom walczącym o prawa obywatelskie dla wszystkich Amerykanów. 

===========================================

Q&A with Activist and LGBT Pioneer Mark Segal

WHEN: Friday November 20 at 18:00

WHERE: ZOOM (a link will be sent to you soon)

A live Q&A session in English on ZOOM, moderated by Dr. Tomasz Sikora, head of the Department of English Literatures at the Pedagogical University of Kraków, and Dr. Dominika Ferens, Professor of American literature and culture at the University of Wrocław. Both Dr. Sikora and Dr. Ferens are members of the editorial board of InterAlia, a journal of queer studies.

Registration required. To register please sign up at: https://bit.ly/2Im180B

Number of participants limited. Registered participants will receive a link to the event by email by 12:00 on November 20. If you have questions for Mark Segal, please include them on the registration form.

Please watch this short video about Mark Segal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCFwOJcMjM0  

You are also invited to watch a longer video about the legacy of Stonewall: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjRv7dJTync

 

Mark Segal

In his 51 years of activism: A participant at the Stonewall rebellion, a founding member of Gay Liberation Front and founder of Gay Youth, a member of The Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day committee which created the first Gay Pride in 1970.  He is best known for his campaign to end LGBT invisibility on TV News and Programming by disrupting live TV shows including The CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite, and the Today Show with Barbara Walters.  40 years after interrupting the Today Show on NBC, he was asked to serve on the Joint Diversity Council of Comcast NBCUniversal to continue to educate the network on LGBT issues. 

He is the founder and publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News, which in 2018 was named one of the nation’s best weekly newspapers by the National Newspaper Association. He has served as President of both The National LGBT Press Association and The National Gay Newspaper Guild and in 2015 published his memoirs “And Then I Danced: traveling the road to LGBT equality”, which was named best book by The National LGBT Journalist Association. 

He partnered with the Obama administration to create and build the nation’s first official “LGBT Friendly” Senior Affordable housing apartment building.  The 19.8 million dollar project known as The John C. Anderson Apartments opened in 2013. 

Last year his personal papers and artifacts from the last 50 years were added to the collection of The Smithsonian Institute of American History in Washington DC.  

Studenci I roku anglistyki z językiem francuskim proszeni są o kontakt na Skype z Panią dr Sobczak o godz. 17.00. Sobczak.al@wp.pl

Szanowni Państwo, Studentki i Studenci Wydziału Filologicznego UŁ,
zwracam się do Państwa z prośbą o rozważenie swojego indywidualnego kandydowania w wyborach na przedstawicieli studentów i doktorantów w składzie naszej Rady Wydziału w kadencji rozpoczynającej się w 2020/21. Bardzo nam zależy na obecności Państwa w tej ważnej strukturze, decydującej o najważniejszych sprawach Wydziału. Zgłoszenia swojej własnej kandydatury przekazywane są drogą mailową do dn. 4 lipca 2020 do godz. 8-ej na adres: ukwss@unilodz.eu, zgodnie z zapisami komunikatu UKWSS: http://filolog.uni.lodz.pl/wp-content/uploads/komunikat_ukwss_nr1.pdf (proszę o zwrócenie uwagi szczególnie na p. 2). W zgłoszeniu należy sprecyzować, że chodzi o Państwa kandydaturę do Rady Wydziału Filologicznego. Aplikować mogą osoby studiujące zarówno na I, jak i na II stopniu (również rekrutujący się na II stopień). Posiedzenia Rady Wydziału odbywają się nie częściej niż w jeden z ostatnich piątków miesiąca (nie w każdym miesiącu Rada musi się zbierać); trwają średnio 2 h; rozpoczynają się zwykle o godz. 10 lub 11-ej. Studencki głos i monitorowanie przez studentów spraw podnoszonych na Radzie jest naprawdę potrzebne. Bardzo na Państwa liczę.
Prof. Joanna Jabłkowska
Dziekan Wydziału Filologicznego

Informacja dotyczy studentów II roku studiów I stopnia

W dniach 22-24 czerwca 2020 odbędzie się rejestracja na seminaria licencjackie.

Rejestracja odbędzie się przez system USOS. Rozpocznie się 22 czerwca 2020 o godz. 22.00 i zakończy 24 czerwca 2020 o godz. 23.59.

W ramach wyboru seminariów licencjackich należy zapisać się na jedno seminarium przypisane do grupy identyfikowanej nazwiskiem promotora. Opisy proponowanych seminariów znajdą Państwo w zakładce „Opisy kursów”.

W zapisach obowiązuje limit ilości osób w każdej grupie. Po wyczerpaniu limitu miejsc system uniemożliwia zapisywanie się kolejnych osób.