dr hab. Mikołaj Deckert, prof. UŁ, Audiovisual Translation

The BA seminar covers the basic theoretical and practical notions of Audiovisual Translation, or Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility. Students will get to know different research methods and tools that can be productively used in their BA projects. An important objective is to make participants aware of the idiosyncrasies of particular AVT modes, and enable participants to identify factors that influence the translator’s decisions, for instance in the context of translation quality assessment.

The seminar will also focus on the very process of planning, structuring and writing the BA thesis – discussing issues like data types, data selection and collection, hypothesis formulation, referencing, register, and text editing.

 

Dr hab. Tomasz Dobrogoszcz, prof. UŁ, Constructed worlds/simulated realities

According to the French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, the author of the theory of the simulacra, we all constantly live in a virtual reality. Our experience of the world is necessarily mediated and indirect, it is an illusion which we accept as truth, for lack of better options. What is more, we often lose the ability to distinguish between the real and the representation, or we even consider a copy as “more real” than the reality. The issue of simulated reality features in philosophical disputes on the nature of existence, it resonates in aesthetic discussions on metafictionality in postmodernist literary representations of the world, and it also appears in technological discourses concerning computer-augmented human experience. The seminar will investigate selected contemporary novels and films (e.g., K. Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, J. Fowles’s The Magus, J. Winterson’s The Stone Gods, K. Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions, The Matrix, Black Mirror), tracing in them various dimensions of simulation: phantasmagoric, dystopian, metafictional, philosophical and ethical.

 

dr Justyna Fruzińska, America in the 19th Century

The seminar will be devoted to discussing different aspects of American culture in the 19th century: literature, painting, religion, philosophy, history, popular culture. It will combine discussion of literary and critical sources with watching and analyzing documentary films on various issues connected to 19th-century America.

  • We will read works by Romantic as well as realist writers (e.g. Emerson, Hawthorne, Brockden Brown, Beecher Stowe, Twain, Henry James);
  • we will see paintings by artists from Thomas Cole to John Singer Sargent;
  • we will try to understand new religious movements such as Mormons or Christian Science;
  • we will discuss major historical events of the 19th century: the war of 1812, slavery and abolitionism, the war with Mexico, the gold rush, the industrial revolution, Civil War and reconstruction of the South;
  • we will learn about dime novels, minstrel shows, and American folk heroes such as Buffalo Bill

Although the seminar will focus on the 19th century, I invite all students interested in the US; the range of possible BA topics accepted is far wider than the scope of the seminar, and theses dealing with any issues connected to American literature or popular culture are welcome.

 

dr Agnieszka Rasmus, British Cinema: Landscapes, Themes, Characters

Our seminar will focus on discussing examples of iconic British films from the 1960s to the present. We will discover different landscapes, from the cityscape of London to the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, and look at the way they shape and define our protagonists. We will mingle with aristocrats and the underclass, and accompany them on their journey of self-discovery in heart-warming comedies and gut-wrenching horrors.

If you wish to explore British film, its characters, themes and landscapes, then this seminar is for you.

 

dr Justyna Stępień, Cyborgs, Hybrids and Posthuman Bodies in the Anthropocene

This interdisciplinary seminar traces the ways in which our bodies might be better described as cyborgs, hybrids or the ‘posthuman.’ While examining our engagements with technology, biotechnology and our embodied relations to nonhuman animals and the material planet, the course addresses the notion of the posthuman which, in the contemporary debate, has become a key tool to the understanding the current conditions of the Anthropocene. Drawing on research and concepts from technology studies, feminist and queer theory, environmental and animal studies, we will work through specific examples – relating to reproductive technologies, pharmaceuticals, self-tracking, and animals in space amongst others – to think about who and what we are today. Along with short theoretical and literary essays, we will discuss films, visual art, Tv-series, videos, fashion and games.

 

dr Monika Kocot, Landscapes and Mindscapes in Contemporary Anglophone Literature

The seminar is addressed to all students interested in (cross-cultural) artistic practices which seek to question established cultural narratives concerning identity (of the text), nature, and religion.

The texts we’re going to discuss will foreground the issues of cognition, identity building, and narrative strategies that help us understand the real (and imagined) world(s). We will focus on three major genres/thematic categories:

  • experimental literature (mind-bending texts from the second avant-garde to the present)
  • nature writing (e.g. radical geopoetic approaches; deep time narratives; Zen-inspired literature; indigenous perspectives)
  • travel writing (nomadic subjects; deep time travel narratives)

Comparative approaches (British-Canadian, British-American literature, and intermediality) will be encouraged.

 

dr hab. Przemysław Krakowian, prof. UŁ, Topics in English Language Teaching

This BA diploma seminar is meant for students whose interest lie in the area of language teaching and who wish to write on a variety of topics within persistent issues in ELT in a modern school setting. While the instructor’s principal fields of activity are within the role of popular technology and media in language learning, new technologies in skill development and language assessment, students are welcome to pursue issues relevant to their personal interests within the scope EFL. In terms of their research projects, the students will be provided, where possible, with access to data-sets and relevant research methodology and research support will be provided to those pursuing their own projects.

 

dr Łukasz Salski, Foreign Language Education and Written Communication

This class is intended for anyone interested in language teaching and learning. While most of the input will revolve around theoretical and practical aspects of teaching writing in English as a foreign language, students will be encouraged to pursue their specific interests in the broad field of teaching and learning foreign/second language. Ultimately, the BA diploma project topics may vary from teaching different language skills or subsystems to individual language learner differences or assessment, and from analysis of language teaching techniques or materials to investigation of learning strategies or bilingualism.

 

dr hab. Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, prof. UŁ / dr Anna Gralińska-Brawata, Analysing how people do things with words and the variability in English (different varieties)

The aim of the seminar is to acquaint students with a variety of factors influencing the use of English and ways of investigating the functions of language and variability in speech from the sociolinguistic point of view focusing on the interaction between form and function. The seminar aims at inspiring and preparing students for conducting a research project as part of their B.A. thesis.
Course content: The course will focus on important issues concerning various sources of variability in language use including a range of sociolinguistic variables (e.g. age, gender, ethnicity, social status, identity, speaking styles) and language (including its phonetic features, e.g. dialect and accent differences) in different contexts of use (e.g. professional or private interaction, advertising, mediated contexts, language of the classroom). These will be based on close analyses of selected audio-visual materials or texts.

 

dr Aleksandra Majdzińska-Koczorowicz, Issues in linguistic analysis

In this seminar students will have the opportunity to investigate the language of newspapers, advertising, and politics in order to be able to specify their area of linguistic interest. It aims at offering an insight into various concepts concerning both written discourse and visual aspects, such as distribution of information, 'figuarative language' (metaphor, metonymy, personification, etc.), framing, distribution of attention (e.g. figure and ground distinction), etc. A focus will also be placed on persuasive language, including presenting arguments, techniques of manipulation/propaganda, personalising strategies, etc.

In this seminar students will have the opportunity to investigate the language of newspapers, advertising, and politics in order to be able to specify their area of linguistic interest. It aims at offering an insight into various concepts concerning written discourse, such as distribution of information, 'figuarative language' (metaphor, metonymy, personification, etc.), framing, distribution of attention (e.g. figure and ground distinction). A focus will also be placed on persuasive language, including presenting arguments, techniques of manipulation/propaganda, personalising strategies, etc.