Konwersatoria językoznawcze A:
  1. Dr hab, prof. UŁ Przemysław Krakowian: Selected issues in the field of EFL/ESL
    This orientation seminar is meant as a presentation of selected issues in the field of EFL/ESL for the BA students, which will provide a comprehensive perspective on the learning/teaching process, with special emphasis on the role of technology in language learning in order to prepare ground for a diploma seminar in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language, with particular focus on: new technologies and the Internet in teaching, mind-sets, digital immigrants and digital natives, mobile learning, online learning platforms and authoring tools, online assessment and computerised/adaptive testing, alternatives in language assessment – portfolio and electronic portfolio in skill development and language assessment.
  2. Dr hab prof. UŁ Janusz Badio: Fundamentals of Cognitive Linguistics
    Cognitive Linguistics studies how our thoughts are reflected in patterns of language and how choices of language form can be explained by looking at human perception of vision, touch, smell, hearing and force. Better understanding of the psychology of language helps explain the meaning of grammatical constructions, expressions and words. The course will cover the following example topics: metaphor (in everyday language but also in literature), metonymy, construal of meaning (e.g., foregrounding, profiling), language use and space/time, nature of (also linguistic) categories, grammatical constructions (e.g. the idea that they help construct meaning despite being abstract/schematic), basics of cognitive outlook(s)n grammar, construal of causation, constructive processes in discourse. Students will be invited to be active in group/pair discussions, solving tasks, and they will write two tests in the middle and towards the end of the course.
  3. Dr Wiktor Pskit: Word-formation across languages
    The aim of the course is to acquaint students with topics in word-formation in English, Polish and other selected languages and to equip students with research tools facilitating contrastive word-formation studies. The issues to be discussed include basic concepts in morphology and word-formation, simple and complex words, inflection and derivation, productivity in word-formation, a contrastive approach to word-formation processes in English, Polish and (selected) other languages, and selected contemporary theoretical approaches to word-formation.
  4. Dr Przemysław Ostalski, Linguistic puzzles in syntax and morphology (and different ways to solve them)
    The objective of the course is to give students an overview of the syntactic and morphological variation across different languages of the world. The course analyzes linguistic puzzles/problems and provides a unique educational activity that combines analytic reasoning and linguistic/cultural awareness. Students learn about the richness, diversity and systematicity of language, while exercising natural logic and reasoning skills. Additionally students discover ways in which speakers of different languages approach reality.
Konwersatoria językoznawcze B:
  1. Dr hab. prof. UŁ Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka: Speech as a type of action: language in professional and other social contexts
    The seminar focuses on language as a type of action in professional and other social contexts. The students will get familiar with a number of sociolinguistic variables and relevant research methods that can be used in linguistics projects. Accepting that speech is a type of action we are naturally interested in the varied interactions between language and society, therefore the course will invite discussions of sociolinguistic issues, including the relationship between linguistic variation and social factors such as (national, ethnic or gender) identity, class and power, code choices in bi-dialectal (or bilingual communities, including pidgin or creole, but also local varieties of English, e.g. Spanglish), professional varieties (e.g. medical or legal language), attitudes towards language and culture. We are also interested in how sociolinguistic issues can be used in teaching English as a foreign language.
  2. Dr Anna Gralińska-Brawata: Varieties of Spoken English
    The aim of the course is to acquaint students with different varieties of spoken English and the most important issues concerning sources of variability in speech from the sociolinguistic point of view. The course will present a number of phonetic corpora and engage students in close analyses of selected audio-visual materials.
  3. Dr hab. prof. UŁ:Krzysztof Kosecki: World Englishes
    The course introduces the varieties of English used around the world. Taking English spoken in England as a point of reference, it discusses the varieties used in Scotland, Ireland, Wales, the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South-East Asia, and the Pacific. It discusses their historical development, as well as illustrates the phonological, lexical, syntactic, and semantic properties by means of sample texts and recordings.
  4. Dr Przemysław Ostalski, Linguistic puzzles in semantics and phonology (and different ways to solve them)
    The objective of the course is to give students an overview of the semantic and phonological variation across different languages of the world. The course analyzes linguistic puzzles/problems and provides a unique educational activity that combines analytic reasoning and linguistic/cultural awareness. Students learn about the richness, diversity and systematicity of language, while exercising natural logic and reasoning skills. Additionally students discover ways in which speakers of different languages approach reality.
Konwersatoria literaturoznawcze:
  1. Prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher: Medieval and Early Modern Literature Tutorial
    The tutorial is aimed at developing the student’s competence as regards the understanding and interpretation of early (Medieval and Early Modern) literary texts belonging to a broadly conceived canon of English literature written before, more or less, the end of the 18th century. Particular attention is going to be devoted to poetry and drama. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres and epochs, including  film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.
  2. Dr Magdalena Cieślak: English Medieval and Renaissance Literature and its Contemporary Readings .
    The course will look at selected Medieval and Renaissance texts (both poetic and dramatic) to explore possibilities of their multiple interpretations, and to compare them with contemporary attempts to present those texts in literature and cinema. Texts will range from Beowulf to Shakespeare’s plays, and their contemporary readings, like Justin Kurzel’s 2015 film adaptation of Macbeth. The course offers advanced background information concerning the Old English, Medieval and Renaissance literature, focusing on the possibilities of numerous and various interpretations. It allows for exploration of literary texts from historical perspectives, and for discussing ideological dimensions of literary texts. It aims at promoting the students’ awareness of the development, transformation and continuation of literary motifs, and enhances their abilities to formulate and express their own opinions and judgements. The course is examined by regular and active participation, a short analytical note, a group project, and a final quiz.
  3. Prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher, [as above]
Przedmiot orientujący A:
  1. Dr Justyna Fruzińska: Ethical problems in American literature and film
    The course is devoted to discussing several ethical issues presented in literature and documentary film. The works analyzed by the students refer to problems such as racism, identity, responsibility, ethics v aesthetics. The syllabus icludes authors such as Vladimir Nabokov, Richard Rorty, James Baldwin, or Philip Roth..
  2. Dr Martin Hinton: Introduction to the Theory of Argument
    As the political and media worlds wrestle with questions of what information is real and what is fake, who can be believed and who is spreading lies, and how the level of public debate can be raised above the empty slogans of populists and marketing professionals, it has never been more important to have a sound grasp of the mechanisms of argument, reasoning and persuasion. On this course, we first look at what arguments are and how they are constructed; both in terms of the reasoning they contain and the kinds of dialogue in which they are situated. From here, we move on to an examination of how they are expressed, learning to recognise the rhetorical devices employed in the art of persuasion, and considering the close relationship between language and reasoning, and how they influence the formation of belief. Finally, we take on the challenge of assessing and evaluating argumentative texts, discussing what it means for an argument to be acceptable, and what it means for it to be fallacious.As well as reading from a number of authors at the forefront of modern argumentation research, we shall study texts taken from contemporary political speeches, advertising campaigns, and other areas of persuasive public discourse.
Przedmiot orientujący B:
  1. Dr hab. prof. UŁ Katarzyna Ostalska:
  2. Prof. dr hab. Andrzej Wicher:A Literary Tutorial in Anglophone Fantastic Literature
    The tutorial is, generally speaking, focused on  (mainly anglophone) fantastic literature (fantasy and science fiction) in its historical development, starting with the Gothic novel and ending with the late 20th c. fantasy literature. The planned semester papers should concern the above mentioned genres, including  film adaptations. Longer texts will be discussed on the basis of selected excerpts.
  3. Mgr Mark Tardi, Like Totally ‘80s!: Exploring a Pivotal Decade
    Big hair. Big cars. Embarrassing fashion. New Wave music. The AIDS epidemic. MTV. This course is an exploratory seminar which will consider the lasting effects and influences of the 1980s in America through landmark work at the time. The work of prominent figures such as Michael Jackson, John Hughes, Madonna, Whitney Houston, Alice Walker, Prince, Bret Easton Ellis, Don DeLillo, Bill Cosby, and others will be examined critically and in a wider context. What do the various works reveal about prevailing concerns at the time? What fears persist? How are racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, and socioeconomic differences portrayed? What impact can be seen today?